The State against Society: Political Crises and Their Aftermath in East Central Europe

By Grzegorz Ekiert | Go to book overview

NOTES

PREFACE AND ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
1
Albert Hirschman, “The Turn to Authoritarianism in Latin America and the Search for Its Economic Determinants,” in The New Authoritarianism in Latin America, ed. David Collier (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1979), 98.
2
See, for example, David Stark and Victor Nee, “Toward an Institutional Analysis of State Socialism,” in Remaking the Economic Institutions of Socialism, ed. Victor Nee and David Stark (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1989), 1–31; Ellen Comisso, “Where Have We Been and Where Are We Going? Analyzing Post-Socialist Politics in the 1990s,” in Political Science: Looking to the Future, ed. William Crotty (Evanstone: Northwestern University Press, 1991), 77–122; Andrew C. Janos, “Social Science, Communism, and the Dynamics of Political Change,” World Politics 44, no. 1 (1991): 81–112; Ken Jowitt, “Weber, Trotsky and Holmes on the Study of Leninist Regimes,” Journal of International Affairs 45, no. 1 (1991): 31–49; Raymond C. Taras, ed., Handbook of Political Science Research on the USSR and Eastern Europe (Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1992).
3
Comisso, “Where Have We Been,” 79.
4
Janos M. Rainer, “The Yeltsin Dossier: Soviet Documents on Hungary, 1956,” Cold War International History Project Bulletin, no. 5 (Spring 1995), 22. See also Jiri Valenta and Jan Moravec, “Could the Prague Spring Have Been Saved?” Orbis 35, no. 4 (Fall 1991): 581–601; Mark Kramer, “New Sources on the 1968 Soviet Invasion of Czechoslovakia,” Cold War International History Project Bulletin 2 (Fall 1992): 1, 4–13; Csaba Bekes, “New Findings on the 1956 Hungarian Revolution,” Cold War International History Project Bulletin 2 (Fall 1992): 1–3; Janos M. Rainer, “The Other Side of the Story: Five Documents from the Yeltsin File, “New Hungarian Quarterly 34, no. 129 (1993): 100–114.
5
See, for example, Wojciech Jaruzelski, Stan Wojenny: Dlaczego … (Warszawa: BGW, 1992); Witold Beres and Jerzy Skoczylas, General Kiszczak mowi … Prawie wszystko (Warszawa: BGW, 1991); Mieczyslaw F. Rakowski, Jak to sie stalo (Warszawa: BGW, 1991); Pameti Vasila Bilaka: Unikatni svedectvi ze zakulisi KSC (Prague: Agentury Cesty, 1991); Alexander Dubcek, Hope Dies Last (New York: Kodansha, 1993); Zbigniew Wlodek, ed., Tajne Dokumenty Biura Politycznego: PZPR a Solidarnosc 1980–1981 (London: Aneks, 1992); Anna Karas, ed., Sad nad autorami stanu wojennego (Warszawa: BGW, 1993).
6
Andrew Janos, “Social Science, Communism, and the Dynamics,” 82.
7
George Schopflin, Politics in Eastern Europe, 1945–1992 (Oxford: Blackwell, 1993), 3.
8
Daniel N. Nelson, “Comparative Communism: A Postmortem,” in Taras, Handbook, 303.
9
Adam Przeworski, for example, stated that “hundreds of macrohistorical comparative sociologists will write thousands of books and articles correlating background conditions with outcomes in each country, but I think they will be wasting their time.” Democracy and the Market (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1991), 3.

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