The Negro and Southern Politics: A Chapter of Florida History

By H. D. Price | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This study has grown out of a thesis originally written at the University of Florida in 1952-53. A large debt of gratitude is owed to Dr. William G. Carleton, who originally suggested the topic and served as chairman of the supervisory committee, and to Dr. Manning J. Dauer, who also furnished invaluable guidance both in preparing the original thesis and in bringing it up to date. The present study has also benefited from the suggestions of Professor V. O. Key Jr., of Mr. Richard E. Caves, both of Harvard University, and Mr. Wilson Follett of the New York University Press.

In a work of this sort one must often turn to interview sources. The sixty Negro and white leaders interviewed--most of whom must remain anonymous--are entitled to a special note of thanks. In arranging the interviews the co-operation of Crawford Solomon in Jacksonville, John B. Orr Jr. in Miami, C. J. Hardee Jr. in Tampa, and Edward D. Davis in Ocala proved to be of particular assistance.

For their courtesy in supplying local registration figures and precinct election returns the author is indebted to the supervisors of registration in the counties visited, and especially to Mr. Fleming H. Bowden, whose registration office in Jacksonville has been a model of efficient service even in the face of repeated requests for various materials. The Honorable R. A. Gray, Florida Secretary of State, has also been unusually helpful in supplying state and county data. Finally, much of the material relating to developments during 1956 was obtained through the efforts of my brother, John R. Price.

I am grateful to the Graduate Council of the University of Florida for the University Fellowship that made this study possible, and to

-iii-

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The Negro and Southern Politics: A Chapter of Florida History
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Acknowledgments iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures vii
  • Introduction ix
  • I. Politics--For Whites Only? 3
  • 2. Negro Registration 26
  • 3. Campaign Tactics and the Negro Voter 59
  • 4. the Negro and the Pattern of Florida Politics 82
  • Notes 113
  • Bibliographical Note 125
  • Index 129
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