Fifty Years of Communism: Theory and Practice, 1917-1967

By G. F. Hudson | Go to book overview

XIX
COMMUNISM AND THE THIRD WORLD

WITH the formation of the NATO and Warsaw Pact blocs of states bound together by treaties of alliance most of the nations of Europe were aligned on one side or the other of a line which was drawn on a basis of ideology but was also a demarcation between the spheres of influence of the two most powerful nations in the world. In Asia the Soviet Union had an alliance with the Chinese People's Republic (which was a political reality until a late stage of the Sino-Soviet Dispute) and several countries were linked with the US and Britain in the Baghdad (later CENTO) and SEATO combinations, while Japan was aligned with the US under a Security Pact. But many Asian countries, and notably India, were unwilling to join either side and made a principle of "neutralism" or "non‐ alignment" in the conflict between the Western and Soviet blocs. The newly independent states of Africa, geographically remote from the zones of conflict between Russia and the West, all followed the same line and tended to look to India as their model and leader in the international field. Thus the non‐ aligned countries of Asia and Africa came to form a group, not bound together by treaties of alliance, but loosely united by a common attitude towards the two great power blocs. In consequence this group came to be known as "the Third World".

All these countries were in 1945 by Marxist classification either colonial or semi-colonial. The colonial countries were those actually under the administrative control of European powers, whether as territories under their full sovereignty or

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Fifty Years of Communism: Theory and Practice, 1917-1967
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Fifty Years of Communism - Theory and Practice I9i7-1967 *
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • I - Jacobin and Communist i
  • II - Social Democracy and the Non-Revolution 14
  • III - Marxism and the Russian Narodniks 27
  • IV - Lenin 38
  • V - The Capture of Power in Russia 50
  • VI - Foreign Intervention and Civil War 63
  • VII - The Comintern 76
  • VIII - The Retreat from Socialism 87
  • IX - Stalin and the Revolution from Above 97
  • X - Stalin and the Great Purge 110
  • XI - The Rise of Communism in China 124
  • XII - The Idea of the Popular Front 135
  • XIII - Communism and the Second World War 146
  • XIV - Communism and the Cold War 157
  • XV - Russian Communism after Stalin 166
  • XVI - Peaceful Coexistence 175
  • XVII - Polycentrism 184
  • XVIII - Maoism 194
  • XIX - Communism and the Third World 206
  • XX - Fifty Years After 217
  • Select Bibliography 226
  • Index 231
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