Columbia Chronologies of Asian History and Culture

By John S. Bowman | Go to book overview

Brunei

EARLY EVIDENCE: 7TH–14TH CENTURIES A.D.

As an Islamic state, Brunei traces its early history to its first Muslim ruler; earlierhistoryisentwined with myth and legend, making it difficult to reconstruct a chronology linking the present-day dynasty to an early kingdom. Although transliteration from the Chinese can pose a problem in identifying place names, the most reliable source for early dating is to be found in Chineserecords based on the reports of official court envoys as well as merchants and travelers. There is some evidence that an early mainland kingdom called Funan may be linked to the later kingdoms of Brunei. From as early as the fifth century, the north coast of Borneo has been a stopping-off point on the maritime trade route between China and Indonesia. Trading of camphor and cowries, products for which northwest Borneo is known, are useful references for placinghistoricalrecords in the area that is now Brunei. Following the emergence of the state called P'o-ni by the Chinese, which is possibly linked to earlier kingdoms, more reliable traces are made.

A.D.630: Chinese sources describe a kingdom named P'o-li, which some scholars place in northwest Borneo.

680s: There is evidence of possible settlement along the Bay of Brunei at this time; the settlement becomes known as P'o-ni or Fo-ni in Chinese.

8th century: Chinese coins dating from this time are found at Kota Batu, near Brunei's present-day capital.

835: Records of trade in camphor suggest that northwest Borneo may have connections with Srivijaya at this time.

c. 987: P'o-ni, which in the seventeenth century the Chinese call Bun-lai, and is most likely Brunei, is described as an independent state at this time in an Arabic journal.

13th century: By this time P'o-ni has a large fleet, trades in camphor, and possibly extends its influence to the Sulu archipelago and the Philippines.

1365: According to the Negarakertagama, the Javanese court poem of this time, Burungeng (Brunei) is a tributary state of the Javanese Majapahit empire.

1369: P'o-ni is sacked by Sulu raiders but remains under Majapahit control.

-409-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Columbia Chronologies of Asian History and Culture
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Columbia Chronologies of Asian History and Culture *
  • Contents v
  • Consultants and Contributors vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Columbia Chronologies of Asian History and Culture *
  • Part One - East Asia 1
  • China - Political History 3
  • China - Arts, Culture, Thought, and Religion 79
  • China - Science-Technology, Economics, and Everyday Life 99
  • Japan - Political History 118
  • Japan - Arts, Culture, Thought, and Religion 162
  • Japan - Science-Technology, Economics, and Everyday Life 179
  • Korea 193
  • Taiwan 225
  • Hong Kong 236
  • Macau (Macao) 244
  • Part Two - South Asia 250
  • India - Political History 251
  • India - Arts, Culture, Thought, and Religion 325
  • India - Science-Technology, Economics, and Everyday Life 355
  • Pakistan 370
  • Bangladesh 379
  • Bhutan 384
  • Maldives 389
  • Nepal 393
  • Sri Lanka (Ceylon) 400
  • Part Three - Southeast Asia 408
  • Brunei 409
  • Cambodia 415
  • Indonesia 436
  • Laos 452
  • Malaysia 465
  • Myanmar (Burma) 476
  • The Philippines 488
  • Singapore 501
  • Thailand 506
  • Vietnam 521
  • Part Four - Central Asia 545
  • Mongolia 547
  • Central Asian Republics 566
  • Tibet 577
  • Appendix 1 - National/Independence Days 583
  • Appendix 2 - Scientific-Technological Achievements in Asia 590
  • Appendix 3 - Asian History: a Chronological Overview 603
  • Index 679
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 751

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.