Educational Supervision in Social Work: A Task-Centered Model for Field Instruction and Staff Development

By Jonathan Caspi; William J. Reid | Go to book overview

5
The Person of the Supervisor

This chapter takes an in-depth look at a significant part of supervision that has largely been overlooked. As discussed in chapter 4, the supervisor's experience is an important aspect of the encounter. How supervisors handle themselves has a major impact on the quality of learning for supervisees. Because supervision typically involves intense emotions, the supervisor's ability to monitor and utilize their personal reactions is in the best interest of the supervisee's learning.

This chapter first looks at the supervisor's influential role and reviews positive supervisor attributes. A brief overview of the concept of use of self is given; then the multiple sources of supervisor anxiety are presented to demonstrate the many challenging tasks and issues that face supervisors and cause stress. The necessity of self-awareness, methods for achieving insight, and supervisors' conscious use of self are considered. The chapter ends with a brief discussion of strategies for decreasing supervisor anxiety.


The Supervisor's Influential Role

As stated in the previous chapter, a growing body of empirical studies demonstrate that the supervisor-supervisee relationship has notable influence on supervisee learning (Bogo 1993) and practice patterns (Tolson and Kopp 1988). While both have responsibility in creating a positive and open relationship, the supervisor is in authority and can take the lead (Bogo

-126-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Educational Supervision in Social Work: A Task-Centered Model for Field Instruction and Staff Development
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 338

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.