CONTENTS
List of Illustrationsvii
Prefacexxi
Chronological Tablexxiv
Mapsxxviii
The Ancient and Early Medieval World
Medieval Europe
[CHAPTER I]
Art in the First Centuries of the Christian Era1
Christianity and the Early Christian Church 6 Christian Art Before Constantine 9
[CHAPTER II]
The Art of the Triumphant Christian Church18
Official Art Under Constantine 19 Theodosius and Official Art in the Later Fourth Century 22 Christian Art of the Fourth Century 23 Christian Architecture in the Fourth Century 25 The Fifth Century 36 Rome in the Fifth Century 36 Fifth-Century Architecture and Decoration Outside Rome 42
[CHAPTER III]
The Golden Age of Byzantium49
Byzantine Architecture 50 Byzantine Mosaics 61 The Sumptuary Arts 68 Manuscripts 71 Icons and Iconoclasm 75
[CHAPTER IV]
Barbarian Art78
The Art of the Goths 82 The Art of the Langobards 85 Merovingian Art 87 Art in Scandinavia 91 The Migration Art of the British Isles 93 Christian Art in the British Isles 94
[CHAPTER V]
Carolingian Art107
Carolingian Architecture 109 Carolingian Painting and Sculpture 116
[CHAPTER VI]
Art Outside the Carolingian Empire132
The Art of the British Isles and Scandinavia 132 The Second Golden Age of Byzantium (867-1204) 145 The Byzantine

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