ILLUSTRATIONS
The number in italics refers to the
page on which the illustration appears.

[CHAPTER I]
Art in the First Centuries of the Christian Era
1. The Roman Forum with ruins of the Basilica of Maxentius and Constantine. Photo: Stokstad. 2
2. The spoils of Jerusalem, Arch of Titus, Rome, A.D. 81. Approximately 7' high. Photo: Alinari. 2
3. Column of Trajan, Rome, 113. Photo: Stokstad. 3
4. Column of Marcus Aurelius, Rome, 193. Photo: Deutsches Archaeologisches Institut Rom. 4
5. Tetrarchs, St. Mark's Square, Venice, 305. Porphyry, 4'3" high. Photo: Stokstad. 5
6. Diocletian's Palace at Split, 300-05. Reconstruction by E. Hebrard. Photo: Alinari 5
7. The Good Shepherd, baptistery in the Christian House, Dura-Europos, before 256. Drawing by Henry Pearson. The Dura-Europos Collection, Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven. Museum photo. 10
8. Cubiculum of the Good Shepherd, Catacomb of Domitilla, Rome, early third century. Photo: Ben. di Priscilla. 11
9. The Good Shepherd, Cubiculum of the Good Shepherd, Catacomb of Domitilla, Rome, early third century. Photo: Ben. di Priscilla. 11
10. Three Children in the Furnace, Catacomb of Priscilla, Rome, early third century. Fresco, 20" × 30". Photo: Hirmer Fotoarchiv. 13
11. Mother and Child, Catacomb of Priscilla, Rome, early third century. Photo: Hirmer Fotoarchiv. 13
12. The Jonah sarcophagus, Vatican Cemetery, late third century. Marble. Approximately 2' × 7'. Vatican, Museo Pio Cristiano. Photo: Hirmer Fotoarchiv. 15
13. The story of Jonah, Asia Minor, third century. Marble. Jonah swallowed, 20 5/16" high; Jonah under the gourd, 12 5/8" high; Jonah cast up, 16" high. The Cleveland Museum of Art, purchase from the John L. Severance Fund. Museum photo. 15
14. Christ/Helios, Mausoleum of the Julii, third century. Mosaic, 78" × 64". Vatican City, Rev. Fabbrica de S. Pietro. Photo: Vatican. 17

[CHAPTER II]
The Art of the Triumphant Christian Church
1. Head, knee, and upper arm, colossal figure of Constantine, early fourth century. Marble. Head, approximately 8'6" high. Palazzo dei Conservatori, Rome. Photo: Stokstad. 20
2. Arch of Constantine, Rome, 312-15. Photo: Stokstad. 21
3. Dispensing largesse, Arch of Constantine, Rome, 312-15. Frieze, approximately 40" high. Photo: Alinari. 21
4. Missorium of Theodosius, found in Estremadura, Spain, 388. Repoussé and engraved silver. Diameter, 29 1/8". Academy of History, Madrid. Photo: Deutsches Archaeologisches Institut Rom. 23
5. Sarcophagus of Junius Bassus, Rome, c. 359. Marble, approximately 4' × 8'. Grottos of St. Peter, Vatican. Photo: Hirmer Fotoarchiv. 23
6. Passion Sarcophagus, Catacomb of Domitilla, Rome, second half of the fourth century. Photo: Rolf Achilles. 24
7. Interior of the Church of St. Paul Outside the Walls in the eighteenth century. G. B. Piranesi, 1749. Photo: Blum. 26
8. Plan, Church of Sta. Costanza, Rome, c. 350. Diameter, 62" × 74". After Dehio. 27
9. Interior, Church of Sta. Costanza, Rome, c. 350. Photo: Bildarchiv Foto Marburg. 28
10. Vintaging putti, Church of Sta. Costanza, Rome, c. 350. Mosaic in ring vault. Photo: Bildarchiv Foto Marburg. 28
11. Conjectural plan, Church of the Holy Sepulchre, Jerusalem, mid-fourth century. After K. J. Conant. 30
12. Holy Women at the Tomb and the Ascension, Church of the Holy Sepulchre, early fifth century. Ivory, 7 3/8" × 4 1/2". Bayer. National Museum, Munich. Photo: Bildarchiv Foto Marburg. 31
13. Plan, Old St. Peter's, Rome, fourth century. Approximate measurements: total length, about 653'; interior of the basilica, about 208' × 355'; height of nave, over 105'. After Dehio. 32
14. Interior of Old St. Peter's in the sixteenth century. S. Martino ai Monti, Rome. Fresco. Photo: Anderson/Alinari (Art Resource). 33
15. Plan, Church of San Lorenzo, Milan, late fourth century. After Dehio. 34
16. Floor mosaic, Roman villa at Hinton St. Mary, England, fourth century. The British Museum, London. Museum photo. 35
17. The Crucifixion and the suicide of Judas, Rome or

-vii-

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