CHRONOLOGICAL TABLE
0-499
THE ARTS
Colosseum completed, 80
Arch of Titus, Rome, 81
Column of Trajan, 113
Rebuilding of Pantheon, 115-127
Catacomb paintings and sarcophagi, Rome
Christ-Helios mosaic, Vatican
Christian house, synagogue, Dura-Europos, before 256
Diocletian's Palace, Split, 300-305
Arch of Constantine, Rome, 312-315
Church of St. Peter, Rome, 319-337
Church of the Holy Sepulchre, Jerusalem, c. 325
Imperial Palace and churches, Constantinople, before 337
Church of San Lorenzo, Milan, 355-375, 390
Sarcophagus of Junius Bassus, Rome, c. 359
Church of Sta. Costanza, Rome, after 359
Missorium of Theodosius, 388
Walls of Constantinople, 408-413
Mausoleum of Galla Placidia, Ravenna, c. 425
Sta. Maria Maggiore, Rome, 432-440
Church of St. John, Ephesus
Baptistery of the Orthodox, Ravenna, c. 450
Church of Hagios Giorgios (formerly Mausoleum of Galerius)
Church of St. Paul Outside the Walls, Rome, after 440

PEOPLE & EVENTS
Crucifixion of Jesus, 30/33
Romans invade Britain, 43
Nero, Emperor, 54-68
First persecution of Christians, 64
Eruption of Vesuvius, destruction of Pompeii, 79
Titus, Emperor, 79-81
Trajan, Emperor, 98-117; greatest extent of the Roman Empire
Hadrian, Emperor, 117-138
Marcus Aurelius, Emperor, 161-180
Goths cross the Danube, 238; invade Gaul, 280s
Christianity made a "permitted religion," 260
Diocletian, Emperor, 284-305
Persecution of Christians, 303-311
Constantine, Emperor, 306-337; Battle of Milvian Bridge, 312
Edict of Milan, 313; religious toleration
Founding of Constantinople, 324
Huns invade Europe, c. 350
St. Ambrose, Bishop of Milan, 373-397
Theodosius I, Emperor, 379-395
Christianity made official religion of the Empire, 380
St. Jerome translates the Bible into Latin, 382-405
St. Augustine, Bishop of Hippo, 393-430
Honorius moves western capital to Ravenna, 402
Roman legions withdraw from Britain, 400-410
Goths under Alaric sack Rome, 410
St. Augustine writes City of God, 413-426
Visigoths conquer Spain, 416-418
St. Patrick in Ireland, 432-461
Pope Leo I, 440-461
Attila, King of the Huns, 433-453, destroys Milan, 450, spares Rome, 452
Theodoric, King of Ostrogoths, 471-526; founds kingdom in Italy, 493
Romulus Augustulus, last western Roman emperor, 475‐ 476
Clovis, King of the Franks, 481-511, accepts Christianity, 496
500-599
THE ARTS
Tomb of Theodoric, Ravenna, 526
Church of S. Apollinare Nuovo, Ravenna, 526-549
Church of Hagia Sophia, Constantinople: 532-537; dome rebuilt, 558
Church of S. Apollinare in Classe, 532/36-559
Church of Holy Apostles, Constantinople, rebuilt 536‐ 550
Church of S. Vitale, Ravenna, 547
Church of St. Catherine, Mt. Sinai: mosaic, 548
Rabbula Gospels, c. 506

PEOPLE & EVENTS
Pseudo Dionysius (Dionysius the Areopagite), c. 500
St. Benedict of Nursia (d. 543) founds Benedictine Order at Monte Cassino, 529
Justinian, Byzantine emperor, 527-565
Justinianic law code, 529-534
Lombards establish kingdom in northern Italy, 568; accept Christianity
Muhammad, prophet of Islam, c. 570-632
Pope Gregory the Great, 590-604
St. Augustine to England, 596
600-699
THE ARTS
Sutton Hoo treasure
Votive crown of Recceswinth, before 672

-xxiv-

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