CHAPTER V
Carolingian Art

In the year 800, at the high altar of St. Peter's basilica in Rome, Pope Leo III crowned the Frankish King Charles as Emperor of Rome. When Charles the Great, better known as Charlemagne, accepted the crown from Leo III, he declared himself to be the legitimate heir to the throne of Constantine. The coronation of the emperor by the Pope strengthened both the Church and the state: the Pope reaffirmed his privilege to crown and anoint the ruler, and received military assistance in exchange; the new emperor could claim divine sanction for his acts and by this means gain moral and psychological superiority over his political foes. Theoretically, in 800 the Roman Christian Empire of Constantine was reestablished as people imagined it to have been. The new imperial realm, however, did not extend over Constantine's vast domain, for the Byzantine emperor or empress ruled the East from Constantinople. Furthermore, Charlemagne, with his interest and authority focused on the lands of France, Germany, and Italy, moved the political center of Western Europe from Rome to Aachen in Germany. Still, the dream of a unified, all‐ embracing European empire took hold of contemporary imagination, and, under the strong hand of Charlemagne, it became a near actuality.

How did a Frankish king, descended from Merovingian warlords, become the emperor of Western Europe? Charlemagne's unrivaled position had its roots in the instability of the Merovingian dynasty after the death of Clovis (511). The successors of the great sixth-century leader, challenged by intriguing, aggressive enemies—and further immobilized by their own sloth and incompetence—relegated more and more administrative duties to court officials. Consequently, the mayor of the palace, at first accountable only for the royal estates, assumed responsibility for the day-to-day management of the kingdom, its finances, and its army. By the time Pepin rose to the office at 697, the mayor of the palace was the virtual ruler of France, and the office had become a hereditary position. Because Pepin left no rightful heirs at his death in 714, the succession passed to his illegitimate son, Charles Martel ("The Hammer," 717-741). Charles not only brought the Merovingian nobility under his sway, but, by defeating the invading Islamic forces at the battle of Tours in 732, he also made Western Europe safe for Christianity.

Charles Martel's son, Pepin the Short (741‐ 768), finally deposed the last survivor of the Merovingian dynasty. To obtain sanction for his act, Pepin called upon the papacy, and in return for political assistance Pope Stephen II reanointed Pepin as King of the Franks in 754 at the Abbey of St. Denis, thus initiating the close association between the Frankish monarchs and the vicars of Christ. When Pepin died in 768, his sons, Carloman and Charles, divided the kingdom, but Carloman died in 771, thereby leaving Charles—Charlemagne— the sole monarch of the Franks.

-107-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Medieval Art
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 446

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.