INDEX
Figures in boldface refer to pages on which illustrations appear.
Aachen: center of Carolingian and Holy Roman Empires, 107, 108, 109, 110, 123, 167, 178, 202
complex, plan, 110, 115, 116
manuscripts and illumination, 116-19, 118, 119, 120,121, 121,123, 124, 186, 186
Palatine Chapel, 110-12, 111, 114, 180, 377; doors, 193; mosaics, 111, 129
Abbas, 159
Abbasid dynasty, 159, 160
Abd er-Rahman, 159-60
Abd er-Rahman III, 160, 166
Abelard, Peter, 274
abstraction in art, 3
barbarian, 82, 83, 88
Byzantine, 63, 67, 71, 75, 77, 151, 153
Hiberno-Saxon, 99, 104
Islamic, 162
Late Antique and Early
Christian, 4, 10, 12, 17, 25, 40, 45, 48, 63
see also geometric design and motifs
Academic Master, 135
Ada Gospels, 119, 120,121
Adalhar, Abbot, 128
Adelaide, Queen, 178, 179
Adon, St., 89
Adoptionism, 166
aesthetics: Byzantine art and Neoplatonism, 8, 61-63, 65, 66, 75, 126, 264, 269
Carolingian art, 126
Gothic art, 287-88; Abbot Suger, 268-69
Islamic art, 164-65
Romanesque art, 246, 264; St. Bernard, 246, 254, 263, 266, 269
Agilbert, Bishop, 89
sarcophagus, 89-90, 90
Agiluf, King, 85
helmet, 85-86, 86
Agincourt, battle of, 366-67
Aidan, St., 95
Alan of Walsingham, 340
Alaric, King, 22, 80
Albani Psalter (St. Albans Psalter), 257, 257-58, 259
Albertus Magnus, St., 294
Alcuin, Abbot, 108, 119, 127, 132
Alemanni, 87
Alexander II, Pope, 204
Alexander III, Pope, 269
Alexius Comnenos, Emp., 145, 220
Alfonso I, King, 166
Alfonso II, King, 166, 167
Alfonso III, King (Alfonso the Great), 166, 170
Alfonso VI, King, 166, 220, 233, 261
Alfonso X, King (Alfonso the Wise), 331, 353
Alfred the Great, King, 134
Almoravid dynasty, 162
Alp Arslan, Sultan, 145, 160
Ambrose, St., 22, 34, 213
Amiens: Cathedral, 294, 301, 304, 305, 306,307-08, 308,309, 348-49; sculpture, 315, 319‐ 22, 320, 321, 324,325, 327, 328, 334, 354-55; Vierge Dorée,324,325, 328
stained glass, 377
The Angel of the Annunciation, Martini, 382
Angers: Gothic sculpture, 280
Angers Apocalypse, 381, 383, 383
Angilbert, Abbot, 108, 113, 123
Angles, 81, 93
Anglo-Normans and art, 144, 198, 217, 219, 220, 251-60, 257, 258
architecture, 245, 251-55, 252‐ 56passim, 257, 259,259-60, 260; influence on Gothic, 267, 268, 269, 271
Anglo-Saxons and art, 81, 93, 95, 106, 134, 135, 144
architecture, 138, 139
bone carving, 96, 96
Anglo-Saxons and art (cont.)
goldwork and enamel, 93-94, 94,102
influence of, on Anglo-Norman and Romanesque art, 246, 251, 255, 257-58, 259
influence on, of Carolingian art, 138, 140
manuscripts and illumination, 134, 140-44, 141, 142, 143, 144,246, 251, 259
metalwork, lost-wax process, 193-94
Scandinavian art and myth related to, 93-94, 96, 98, 136, 137, 138
stone crosses, 96, 97, 140, 140
Urnes style, 136, 137
see also Hiberno-Saxon art
Angoulême: Cathedral, 249, 249
Anicia Juliana, Princess, 72
animals in art (as image, motif, and symbol), 68, 118, 119, 186, 214
barbarian, 78-79, 79, 80,82, 83, 84, 87, 88, 91-93, 92, 93,94, 94,106, 126, 134-35, 135, 135-36, 144
Gothic, 369, 371,380, 383-84
Hiberno-Saxon, 99, 100, 101, 102, 102, 103,104
Islamic, 163, 163,164
Late Antique and Early
Christian, 9-10, 10,11, 11, 13, 14
Mozarabic, 172
see also birds in art; monstrous and fantastic subjects
Anjou, 247, 381, 385
Anne, St., 312, 314
Annunciation, Eyck, 389-90, 390
Annunciation, Stoss, 377, 378,392, 395
Antelami, Benedetto, 284
Anthemius of Tralles: Hagia
Sophia, Constantinople,
architecture, 52, 53,54, 294
Anzy-le-Duc: church, sculpture, 240
Apulia, 145, 156, 211, 358, 359

-425-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Medieval Art
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 446

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.