Race Prejudice and Discrimination: Readings in Intergroup Relations in the United States

By Arnold M. Rose | Go to book overview

4. The Filipinos *

Grayson Kirk

[The fifteen million Negroes and the five or six million Jews represent large minorities in the United States. The forty-five thousand Filipinos represent one of the smallest minority groups and are concentrated almost entirely on the West Coast. The Filipinos are one of the newest minorities in this country, although they came into a tradition of already developed attitudes. Not only did they meet the general tendency of Americans to look down on other peoples, but they faced the special attitudes that whites had toward Orientals. Whereas American Negroes trace their ancestry predominantly from the Negroid racial stock, and the Jews from the Caucasoid racial stock, the Filipinos are Mongoloids. The first representatives of this great racial stock on this continent were the American Indians, who, of course, were the original inhabitants. Although there is some biological similarity between Indians and Filipinos, there is no cultural connection at all. Therefore, the Filipinos were not associated with the Indians in white peoples' minds. The Filipinos were, however, associated with the Chinese and Japanese who preceded them in migrating from Asia to North America. The already existing antagonisms against the latter groups, which we shall consider in subsequent sections, were attached to the Filipinos.

Professor Grayson Kirk, now Acting President of Columbia University, presents a succinct summary of the legal and social problems of Filipino Americans.]

Extensive Filipino migration to the continental United States is largely a matter of the last two decades. In 1920, after two decades of American rule in the Philippines, the census indicated only 5,603 Filipinos residing in this country. A decade later there were 45,208, and present estimates agree on 60,000 to 65,000 as the probable number here at the present time. The number of Filipinos residing in Hawaii is somewhat in excess of this last figure.

Unlike many of the minority groups in the United States, the Filipinos have not developed any great social stability. They constitute a mobile labor force, concentrated largely on the west coast but ranging from southern California to Alaska. This mobility is so great that the workers follow the harvests throughout

____________________
*
From The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 223 ( September, 1942, 45-8.Copyright 1942 by The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science. Reprinted by permission of The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science.

-38-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Race Prejudice and Discrimination: Readings in Intergroup Relations in the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 620

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.