Race Prejudice and Discrimination: Readings in Intergroup Relations in the United States

By Arnold M. Rose | Go to book overview

Underpaid and without permanent employment, they have been exposed to little more than the most seamy side of American life.

Temporarily, to be sure, the economic situation has greatly improved. The elimination of Japanese labor and the general drain upon manpower created by the war have placed Filipino laborers in a more favorable position than any which they have previously enjoyed since immigration to this country began. This, however, should not blind the American people to the necessity of thinking about some more satisfactory solution which can be applied when the war is over. When that time comes, and the general relationship between the United States and the Philippines is reexamined, some thought must be given to the future status--economic and social, as well as legal--of those who wish to live permanently in this country.

In this connection the educational aspects of the problem must be considered. Many of the young Filipinos who managed to secure passage money to the United States came here in the hope of obtaining an education which would fit them to have a satisfactory career either in the United States or in the Islands. Many found that their educational preparation was insufficient to enable them to go on with their studies without spending more time and money than they could hope to obtain. Some did persevere and achieve the goal which they had set for themselves, but the great majority found the obstacles insuperable and were compelled to abandon the hope of marked improvement in their status. Lacking a sufficient and stable group to provide their own cultural opportunities, and faced with discrimination which made it difficult for them to take full advantage of American cultural opportunities, they settled gradually into a life which was far different from that which they had hoped to find. Here, once more, the problem is basically an economic one.


5 A Letter to the President of the United States

Chief Talahaftewa and Others

[ The Indians native to North America before the settlement by whites lived in bands and tribes widely scattered over the continent and seldom interfered with each other's lives or territory. There were great cultural differences among them: Some tribes were primitive, whereas others had a high degree of civilized organization. The English who settled on the East Coast were primarily interested in getting the Indians land, and their policy was to push the Indians westward. Some

-42-

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