Race Prejudice and Discrimination: Readings in Intergroup Relations in the United States

By Arnold M. Rose | Go to book overview

selves. Possibly the way has been shown by the Harwood Foundation in its Taos County project, an effort to bring the needs of the villages in a rural county into touch with the public and private agencies in a position to render practical and constructive aid in social as well as economic matters. The project has encouraged local leadership in practical programs of self-help in developing irrigation, correcting erosion, organizing health cooperatives, and improving schools, and it has met with conspicuous local success. Cooperative medical clinics and credit associations should work in any group with such a well developed community sense. The Spanish-American is larger than ever before in numbers; he is slowly becoming assimilated into the broader Anglo culture; he is making a noticeable imprint on that culture locally, and neither he nor his culture is by any means dead.


7. The Mexican American: A National Concern *

Ernesto Galarza

[The Mexican Americans proper have all the characteristics of recent immigrants. Having come from backward rural sections of Mexico and having distinctive racial features of their predominantly Indian ancestors, they find it difficult to assimilate into, or to be accepted by, the dominant American group. Although concentrated in Texas and California, they have spread throughout the entire Midwest, and have made their homes in urban as well as rural places in this country. Wherever they are, however, they are treated as the group furthest down, matched in low social status only by the Negroes. The author of this essay is one of the outstanding leaders of the Mexican group in the United- States. He presents a rather thorough analysis, in succinct and popular terminology, of several aspects of Mexican American life.]

The conditions of life and work of the Spanish-speaking minority in the United States are no longer a problem only of the borderlands. A historical process has been at work lifting this problem above local and sectional concern. It now involves communities as distant from the United States-Mexican border as Chicago, New York, and Detroit. It shows up in the rural slums that lie on an are stretching from Arkansas to northern California. It is

____________________
*
From "The Mexican American: A National Concern. Program for Action," Common Ground, 9 (Summer, 1949), 27-38. Copyright 1949 by Common Ground. Reprinted by permission of Common Ground.

-55-

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