Race Prejudice and Discrimination: Readings in Intergroup Relations in the United States

By Arnold M. Rose | Go to book overview

sometimes one, sometimes the other coming first, for they are interdependent.

The development of the Papago land, like the education of the Papago people, will take time. The transition period will be long and difficult. As new problems arise new solutions may become possible. But the pattern remains. The local resources are wholly insufficient, and can never be expected to support all of the Papago people properly. Whatever use can be made of these resources must be made. The land heritage of the Papago Tribe is all that remains to them of the vast country that once was theirs. The present conditions are not of their making, but in the ultimate solution they can play a part.


16.Ethnic Behavior in Industry *

Orvis Collins

[ Even the nationality minorities in cities, who have been rather thoroughly assimilated into the general American community, retain some ethnic identity, both to themselves and to the outside world. Orvis Collins's study shows how identification of nationality background has both harmful and helpful effects for a minority group. ]

. . .It is one of the shibboleths of modern management that advancement from job to job must be based on efficiency. By "efficiency" is meant the capacity to do work. Management argues that, if an institution is to continue to function, the majority of its members (in this case job-holders) must have at least a minimum capacity for performing their individual functions. Within the factory such attributes as physical strength, education, and age are all at one time or another implied by the term "capacity to do work." To a production engineer a division of labor is necessary, since, for one reason, a 200-pound male can perform certain work more efficiently than a 110-pound female; a man of thirty is able to perform certain physical tasks too great for the strength of the average man of sixty-five; and a graduate of an engineering school can perform work involving mathematics quite beyond a person who left school in the eighth grade.

____________________
*
From "Ethnic Behavior in Industry: Sponsorship and Rejection in a New England Factory," American Journal of Sociology, 51 ( January, 1946), 293-8. Copyright 1946 by the American Journal of Sociology. Reprinted by permission of the American Journal of Sociology.

-169-

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