Race Prejudice and Discrimination: Readings in Intergroup Relations in the United States

By Arnold M. Rose | Go to book overview
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lished a story to the effect that the cholitas and pachucas were merely cheap prostitutes, infected with venereal disease and addicted to the use of marihuana. Eighteen Mexican-American girls promptly replied in a letter which the metropolitan press refused to publish: "The girls in this meeting room consist of young girls who graduated from high school as honor students, of girls who are now working in defense plants because we want to help win the war, and of girls who have brothers, cousins, relatives and sweethearts in all branches of the American armed forces. We have not been able to have our side of the story told." The letter, with a picture of the girls, was published in Al Waxman's Eastside Journal on June 16, 1943. Still another group of Mexican-American girls--real pachucas these--bitterly protested the story in another letter which the metropolitan press did not publish. These girls insisted that they should be examined, as a group, by an officially appointed board of physicians so that they could prove that they were virgins. Long after the riots, I have seen Mexican- American boys pull creased and wrinkled newspaper clippings from their wallets and exhibit this slanderous story with the greatest indignation. Four years have now passed since the riots, but the blood has not yet been washed from the pavements of Los Angeles.


C. Political Discrimination

21. The Negro in the Political Life of the United States *

Ralph J. Bunche

[ As late as the Second World War, all of the Southern states deprived most Negroes of their vote, in defiance of the United States Constitution. The various devices concocted to "get around" the Constitution are reported in the accompanying article. The United States Supreme Court aided in the insult to the Constitution by twisting legal logic--an error which it has since rectified. Mainly because of the Court's correction, and partly because of changing public opinion in the South as well as the North, the article is out of date. But the report of how the minds of American legislators and judges could be twisted by race hatred in the year 1940 will remain a lesson for some time.

____________________
*
From The Journal of Negro Education, 10 ( July, 1941), 567-84. Copyright 1941 by The Journal of Negro Education. Reprinted by permission of The Journal of Negro Education.

-219-

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