Race Prejudice and Discrimination: Readings in Intergroup Relations in the United States

By Arnold M. Rose | Go to book overview

dead body." Two years later, when encountering appreciable opposition in the primary of 1946, he was to be seen putting in an occasional appearance at Negro fish fries and church picnics.

Negro voting has come to Texas to stay. No vigorous reaction against it has appeared; on the contrary, there is already a high degree of white acceptance. Any Negro leader questioned about the extent of 1946 participation in his town will assure you that whatever the turnout in that year, the participation will be yet greater in 1948 and that the efforts made to insure poll-tax payment will be more vigorous. Nor has the white population produced a great champion of white supremacy--a Texas Bilbo. A Negro leadership calling for continued increase in participation and a white population pretty generally accepting the idea, and certainly not united against it, can lead only to continued and increased Negro participation.


23. A Mexican American Runs for Political Office *

Beatrice W. Griffith

[ As one of the most recent immigrant groups, with a low average educational attainment, the Mexican Americans have not participated greatly in American political activity. One of the first instances of significant political education and political activity among them occurred in the campaign of 1947 in Los Angeles, described in the following article. ]

For the first time since 1881, when Jose Mascerel was elected alderman for one year, Los Angeles, California, has elected a councilman of Mexican ancestry to office. Edward Roybal, a sincere, handsome, young veteran with several years of service as educational director for the Los Angeles County Tuberculosis Association, took office July 1 as councilman from the 9th district, in this the second largest Mexican city in the world.

Until recently, the apathy of the Mexican community toward voting has been a cause for cynicism among politicians throughout California. In 1938, the then incumbent Mayor of Los Angeles, when asked about the Mexican vote, tossed it off casually: "Oh, I'm not worried about the Mexican vote. All you need to do to get them to vote is to take a few baskets of groceries or a sack of beans

____________________
*
From "Viva Roybal--Viva America," Common Ground, 10 ( Autumn, 1949), 61-70. Copyright 1949 by Common Ground. Reprinted by permission of Common Ground.

-249-

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