Race Prejudice and Discrimination: Readings in Intergroup Relations in the United States

By Arnold M. Rose | Go to book overview

The Democratic Party is smashed--of that there is no doubt. It chose to run a Wet and Catholic and it has paid the price. As things look today, no living man above thirty years need expect to see a Catholic nominated again for the highest office in the land. Moreover, the completeness of Governor Smith's defeat makes impossible his renomination four years hence, as might have been the case had the election been close. . . . Today we would only add our tribute to the extraordinary campaign made by Governor Smith. Single-handed he waged his fight against the forces most hostile to our American democracy. Privilege and bigotry and religious intolerance he assailed with frankness and superb courage. On the merits of the debate he should have won. But the American people decided not on arguments, but largely upon feelings, passions, and prejudices. No man who had to carry the triple burden of his religion, his "wetness," and his affiliation with Tammany Hall could have waged a better campaign than the Governor of New York. He ends the battle having impressed his personality upon the whole country and having won the lasting affection of multitudes. Let no one deny to him, or to Norman Thomas, the praise they deserve.


D. Social Discrimination

27. No Orientals Are Wanted Here *

Manuel Buaken

[The first Filipinos to come to continental United States were college students, intent on getting an education that would fit them for positions of economic, political, and educational leadership at home. At first they were well received in the university towns where they settled. As soon as they tried to secure jobs, however, they met with rebuffs based on racial discrimination. During the 1920's, a number of relatively poor Filipino boys immigrated in the hope of earning a better living than they could in the Islands. Some of these hoped to go on to college; others expected to continue in the business world. Although the jobs they sought were modest ones--house servants, farm laborers, cannery workers--they met a full blown prejudice against Orientals. They were given only the poorest jobs for which no white workers could be found, and they were frequently cheated out of their earnings. The selection by Manuel Buaken tells of some of the early difficulties of a

____________________
*
From I Have Lived With the American People ( Caldwell, Idaho: The Caxton Printers, Ltd., 1948), 67-75. Copyright 1948 by The Caxton Printers, Ltd. Reprinted by permission of The Caxton Printers, Ltd.

-270-

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