Race Prejudice and Discrimination: Readings in Intergroup Relations in the United States

By Arnold M. Rose | Go to book overview

if people from differing backgrounds live and work together for 40 years or more, they can't help but be influenced in how they do things no matter how impervious they might appear to be to social change.

Finally, these modifications have been accepted at varying rates. Certain ethnic groups have values which are not too far removed from the accepted dominant values of a community. These groups are accepted with little concern by those who control the social standard and set the prestige scale. Other ethnic groups experience more difficulty conforming to a socially acceptable way of life, but are eventually "infected" by the dominant groups if they decide to remain. However, social interaction is a two-way process. Not only does the value system of the Polish and Norwegian change because of his association with the Welsh, but so does that of the Welsh. They are not by any stretch of the imagination the same people they were in 1860 or even in 1920. Consciousness of kind is not only corroded by time but by the inability of most groups "to live unto themselves."

It is fitting to close this paper with a remark of the late George S. Wehrwein that "it takes three generations of a family to own a piece of land and four generations to erase their more obvious old world characteristics." That is the era the Wild Rose community is entering. Further study at Wisconsin and elsewhere will serve to confirm or deny.


35. Chinese Family Life in America *

Norman S. Hayner and Charles N. Reynolds

[The struggle to maintain the Chinese family in face of the ban on immigration, as well as the factors of stability and change in the Chinese family of the United States, are well described in the article by Professors Norman S. Hayner and Charles N. Reynolds. ]

Many Chinese husbands and wives as well as fathers and children live on opposite shores of the Pacific Ocean. This separation explains the fact that the United States Census for 1930 reported as married more than four times as many Chinese men as

____________________
*
From American Sociological Review, 2 ( October, 1937), 630-7. Copyright 1937 by American Sociological Review. Reprinted by permission of American Sociological Review and the authors.

-352-

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