Race Prejudice and Discrimination: Readings in Intergroup Relations in the United States

By Arnold M. Rose | Go to book overview

legal. More legal and sociological research is needed to present a sounder proof to the courts. On the side of getting positive legislation--such as New York's F.E.P.C., New Jersey's anti-segregation clauses, and the various civil rights laws--the democratic processes of education and persuasion need to be stepped-up and refined. Saenger's study shows us that these laws will not be as disruptive as many pessimists predict.* People are probably able to incorporate changes much more easily than we have hitherto believed, and they rationalize changes in their attitudes and behavior so that they may not even be aware of the changes. We also know that practically all Americans--even the more prejudiced ones-- have some feelings against prejudice and discrimination because the latter run counter to the democratic ideals and the conception of "fair play." If a law is in conformity with democratic ideals, its passage and enforcement might not be considered as a deprivation of the rights of the individual who was opposed to the law before its passage, but rather as a means of bringing him in closer conformity with his own ideals. Thus, the more recent studies are bringing in a changing conception of the role of law in reducing prejudice.


54 Interracial Housing and Changes in Attitudes

Morton Deutsch and Mary Evans Collins

[ Reduction of intergroup prejudice and tension is occurring at the present time as a consequence of planned social policy. Housing projects, built either by the government or by private industry with support or loans from government, frequently experiment with mixed racial housing. That such a change in objective conditions has an effect on the attitudes of the members of these communities is demonstrated in the following study. ]

In a preceding article in the Journal of Housing ( Feb. 1950), we have presented research results which indicate that the occupancy pattern of an interracial housing project may pro

____________________
*
Editor's note: Another evidence for this has become available in studies of the effects of Supreme Court decisions outlawing discrimination in voting and in education. See selection 22 in this volume.
†From "Intergroup Relations in Interracial Public Housing: Occupancy Patterns and Racial Attitudes," Journal of Housing, 7 ( April, 1950), 127-9, 134. Copyright 1950 by Journal of Housing. Reprinted by permission of Journal of Housing and the authors. To be reprinted in fuller form in a forthcoming book to be published by the University of Minnesota Press, Interracial Housing: A Study of a Social Experiment.

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