Race Prejudice and Discrimination: Readings in Intergroup Relations in the United States

By Arnold M. Rose | Go to book overview

regarded as an ogre or a threat, he becomes accepted, and his teaching, if not enthusiastically received, lingers well after the course is concluded.

A corollary of what I am saying is that re-trainers who encounter more resistance than they expect may need to provide more abundantly than they do for the free expression of hostility. Let them be willing targets for the emotional catharsis for as many hours as necessary. If they do so, they will probably find that the gains in the closing hours of the session are appreciable and that the subsequent gains are even greater. The cathartic process has led his listeners to admit some guilt even while evading some, or to shock themselves out of their complacency, or to exhaust their pent-up hostility until they are receptive to new facts and new points of view. It is only then that the restructuring of attitudes begins.


57 A New Problem for Negroes: Integration *

Lester B. Granger

[ The role of a minority person himself in combating prejudice is brought out in the following excerpt from a speech by Lester B. Granger, who is Director of the National Urban League. The thesis is that, as a consequence of the favorable trends of the past decade or so, the Negro should not only strive to combat discrimination directly but should also take steps to integrate himself into the general body of American citizens. ]

I hold that non-segregation and integration do not mean the same thing. There is a big difference between an absence of segregation and discrimination and the establishment of an integrated community life. Non-segregation implies an absence of physical compulsion that separates groups of people, and usually separates them against their will. Integration, on the other hand, means the voluntary and mutual acceptance of joint responsibilities for living and working and planning together. There is a grave danger that this developing generation of Negro youth will discover, a few years from now, that while the present imperfect democratic order is being gradually improved, the young Negro

____________________
*
From "The Role of the College in Preparing the Student for Integration," speech delivered at the inauguration of President Moron at Hampton Institute, 1949. Printed by courtesy of the author.

-580-

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