Race Prejudice and Discrimination: Readings in Intergroup Relations in the United States

By Arnold M. Rose | Go to book overview

problem back again. For in the twisted thinking and the distorted personalities that have been the result of our racial experience during the past three hundred years on both sides of the racial fence we have planted seeds that are bound to multiply and reproduce on either side of that fence, wherever they are left. Our job in training young Negroes for an integrated life in the world of tomorrow is to understand the true meaning of integrated life and to understand the responsibility which the individual must carry with him wherever he goes for becoming an integrated influence. Our job is then to give the Negro student at the same time that the white student is given his, the encouragement, the understanding, and the inspiration to go forward and do his share.


58. The Next Steps for the South *

Howard W. Odum

[The following program for the South is proposed by a Southerner, Professor Howard W. Odum of the University of North Carolina. Dr. Odum, a sociologist, is one of the most respected educators in the South, and in the following article reveals a great deal of his insight and courage.]

From all walks of life in the South--old and young, men and women, white and Negro, rural and urban--people are asking, as never before, soul-searching questions about what is best for the South to do in this time of crisis and conflict in the Nation. They are searching with equal earnestness for responsible answers to their inquiries as to what are the actual facts of this staggering dilemma and what is the relation of these facts to the inescapable issues to be faced. They not only want answers but they want to have a part in determining the right answers.

So, too, all over the country, in all the other regions, millions of other people are asking the same questions and insisting on having a part in answering them; for after all, the participants and the programs of action are broadly regional and national rather than narrowly sectional and partisan.

____________________
*
From "This is Worth Our Best," The Southern Packet, 5 ( January, 1949), 1-7. Copyright 1949 by The Southern Packet. Reprinted by permission of The Southern Packet and the author.

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