NOTE

By MARCEL MAUSS

THIS work is the last which Henri Hubert expressly prepared for printing. He had promised it to M. Berr long before the War.1

He had worked long at it. He had lectured on the subject twice in his class of Celtic Archœology at the École du Louvre. He did so a third time in two years, in 1923-4 and 1924-5. We have the complete draft of these courses.

All that remained to be done was to give it the form of a book. Two-thirds of this task was done when Hubert died. The manuscript was in almost perfect condition, notes included, down to the end of the second part (the chapter on the Celts of the Danube).2 Beyond that point the executors of Hubert's wishes had only his course of lectures, which, it is true, was in an admirable state. The illustrations were almost entirely arranged.

It was our duty to make good the promise which he had made to our friend M. Berr. With the lectures, we have finished the book. For that there were three of us co-operating.

It was only right that M. P. Lantier, Hubert's successor at Saint-Germain and one of the men whom he had trained in archœology, should draw up the text of what was lacking in the second part of the book.3 Here the lectures are in excellent condition. I myself have dealt with one chapter (second volume, Part II, Chapter I).

The third part of the book, that which treats of the social life and civilization of the Celts,4 has a different history. It had formed the subject of a very long course, lasting a year. But the present work, although published in two volumes, would have been too long for this series if Hubert had published without alteration the admirable matter which he had prepared with this intention. To come into line with the instructions of the director

____________________
1
Together with another on the Germans, which, we hope, will appear shortly, with the aid of M. Janse.
2
Second volume, pt. i, chap. ii.
3
Second volume, pts. i and ii.
4
Second volume, pt. iii.

-xxi-

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