Nevada: A Guide to the Silver State

By Nevada Writers' Program | Go to book overview

First Nevadans

NEVADA has made important contribution to support the conclusion that what is now the southwestern part of the United States was inhabited by human beings as far back as eight to ten thousand years ago. The oldest evidence of such habitation in Nevada was found in Gypsum Cave, about twenty miles northeast of Las Vegas, during excavations carried on in 1930 and 1931. This cave had been discovered about the time white men first began to settle in Nevada but had attracted attention merely because of its gypsum deposits until someone began to dig down through the many layers of deposits on the floor of its five deep chambers. The upper layers revealed relics of fairly recent Paiute occupation; farther down relics of earlier cultures were found--the Pueblo III and, lower, the Basketmaker. Eventually the excavators reached layers of excrement deposited by the long-extinct ground sloth. There among fossil remains of the ground sloth--bones, claws, and wisps of coarse, yellowish hair--were found charred pieces of wood, worked flint dart points, and primitive ropes of twisted sinew--sure evidence of man's presence in the cave during the lifetime of the prehistoric beast. Of especial interest was the discovery of short, painted wooden shafts, possibly primitive atlatls, or spear-throwers.

Also in the southeastern part of the State, in an area roughly coinciding with, though slightly more extensive than the creosote bush zone (see Plant and Animal Life), are several sites revealing occupation during the Basketmaker and up through the first three Pueblo cultures. The latest and most extensive of the settlements yet discovered was that of Pueblo Grande de Nevada--called Lost City. The site, now largely hidden beneath the waters of the northern arm of Lake Mead, probably flourished some time between 600 and 900 A. D. Excavations at this site, which was five or six miles long, brought to light skeletons, and thousands of pieces of pottery--some intact and some broken--as well as turquoise jewelry, bits of basketry, scraps of cotton textiles, stone and bone implements, and shell beads. Vestiges of irrigation ditches were traced and ruins were found that indicated houses, or storage rooms, built below ground, as well as flat-roofed houses erected above ground.

-22-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Nevada: A Guide to the Silver State
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • Maps xiii
  • General Information xv
  • Part I - Nevada's Background 1
  • The Silver State 3
  • Natural Setting 6
  • Plant and Animal Life *
  • First Nevadans 22
  • Wilderness to Modern State *
  • Mining and Mining Jargon 55
  • Ranching and Stock Growing *
  • Stock Jargon 75
  • Press, Church, and School 79
  • The Arts *
  • Sports and Recreation 107
  • Part II - Touring the State *
  • Part III - Appendices 287
  • Chronology 289
  • Supplementary Reading List of Nevada Books 297
  • Index Principal Reference First 305
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 315

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.