Program of the Eleventh Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society: 16-19 August 1989, Ann Arbor, Michigan

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Program of the Eleventh Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society
16-19 August 1989 Ann Arbor, Michigan

LAWRENCE ERLBAUM ASSOCIATES, PUBLISHERS 1989 Hillsdale, New Jersey Hove and London

-i-

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Program of the Eleventh Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society: 16-19 August 1989, Ann Arbor, Michigan
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Proceedings of the Eleventh Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society Ann Arbor, Michigan - August 16-19, 1989 v
  • Author Listing xvii
  • Chunking in a Connectionist Network 1
  • Acknowledgments 8
  • References 8
  • A Pdp Model of Sequence Learning That Exhibits the Power Law Yoshiro Miyata Bell Communications Research 9
  • Introduction 9
  • Conclusion 16
  • References 16
  • Structured Representations and Connectionist Models 17
  • Introduction 17
  • Conclusions 21
  • Acknowledgements 22
  • References 22
  • Is There "Catastrophic Interference" in Connectionist Networks? 26
  • References 33
  • Compositionality and the Explanation of Cognitive Processes 34
  • References 41
  • Learning from Error 42
  • Introduction 42
  • References 49
  • A State-Space Model for Prototype Learning 50
  • Introduction 50
  • Conclusions 57
  • Acknowledgements 57
  • References 57
  • Learning Simple Arithmetic Procedures 58
  • Introduction 58
  • Conclusions 64
  • References 65
  • Thiyos: A Classifier System Model of Implicit Knowledge of Artificial Grammars 66
  • Introduction 66
  • References 73
  • Acknowledgements 73
  • Lexical Conceptual Structure and Generation in Machine Translation 74
  • Introduction 74
  • Summary 80
  • References 81
  • Acknowledgements 81
  • Robust Lexical Selection in Parsing and Generation 82
  • Abstract 82
  • Conclusions and Future Work 89
  • Acknowledgements 89
  • References 89
  • Causal/Temporal Connectives: Syntax and Lexicon 90
  • Abstract 90
  • References 106
  • The Frame of Reference Problem in Cognitive Modeling 107
  • Abstract 107
  • Summary and Conclusion: Who Owns the Knowledge? 111
  • References 113
  • The Many Uses of 'Belief' in Ai 115
  • Introduction 115
  • Conclusion 121
  • References 122
  • Using View Types to Generate Explanations in Intelligent Tutoring Systems 123
  • Introduction 123
  • Conclusion 128
  • Acknowledgements 129
  • References 129
  • Relations Relating Relations 131
  • Abstract 131
  • References 131
  • Conclusions 137
  • References 137
  • Integrating Generalizations with Exemplar-Based Reasoning 139
  • Introduction 139
  • Conclusion 145
  • Acknowledgments 146
  • References 146
  • Combining Explanation Types for Learning by Understanding Instructional Examples 147
  • Introduction 147
  • Conclusion 154
  • Acknowledgements 154
  • References 154
  • Selecting the Best Case for a Case-Based Reasoner 155
  • Introduction 155
  • Bibliography 161
  • Integrating Feature Extraction and Memory Search 163
  • Conclusions 169
  • Acknowledgements 170
  • The Function of Examples in Learning a Second Language from an Instructional Text 171
  • Abstract 171
  • References 171
  • Refrences 178
  • Token Frequency and Phonological Predictability in a Pattern Association Network: Implications for Child Language Acquisition 179
  • Introduction 179
  • Conclusions 184
  • Acknowledgements 184
  • References 187
  • Towards a Connectionist Phonology: the "Many Maps" Approach to Sequence Manipulation 188
  • Acknowledgements 195
  • References 195
  • A Connectionist Model of Form-Related Priming Effects 196
  • Introduction 196
  • Conclusions 203
  • References 203
  • Acknowledgements 203
  • Figurative Adjective-Noun Interpretation in a Structured Connectionist Network 204
  • Abstract 204
  • Summary 211
  • Acknowledgements 211
  • References 211
  • Anomalous Conditional Judgments and Ramsey's Thought Experiment 212
  • Conclusions 217
  • References 219
  • Competition for Evidential Support 220
  • Abstract 220
  • Bibliography 226
  • Managing Uncertainty in Rule-Based Reasoning 227
  • Introduction 227
  • Acknowledgements 234
  • References 234
  • Explorations in the Contributors to Plausibility 235
  • Introduction 235
  • Conclusion 243
  • Acknowledgments 243
  • References 243
  • A Theory of the Aspectual Progressive 244
  • Introduction 244
  • Summary 251
  • Introduction 251
  • Default Values in Verb Frames: Cognitive Biases for Learning Verb Meanings 252
  • Introduction 252
  • References 258
  • Generating Temporal Expressions in Natural Language 259
  • Introduction 259
  • Conclusions 265
  • Acknowledgements 265
  • References 265
  • The Role of Abstraction in Place Vocabularies 267
  • Introduction 267
  • Conclusions 272
  • Acknowledgments 273
  • References 273
  • Cognitive Efficiency Considerations for Good Graphic Design 275
  • Introduction 275
  • Summary 282
  • References 282
  • Acknowledgements 282
  • A Process Model of Experience-Based Design 283
  • Introduction 283
  • Concluding Remarks 290
  • References 290
  • Cognition in Design Process 291
  • Introduction 291
  • Conclusion 297
  • Acknowledgement 298
  • References 298
  • Evaluation of Suggestions during Automated Negotiations 299
  • Abstract 299
  • References 299
  • Conclusion 304
  • References 306
  • Composite Holographic Associative Recall Model (Charm) and Blended Memories in Eyewitness Testimony 307
  • Introduction 307
  • Conclusions 311
  • References 314
  • A Two-Stage Categorization Model of Family Resemblance Sorting 315
  • Introduction 315
  • Conclusion 322
  • References 322
  • References 322
  • A Configural-Cue Network Model of Animal and Human Associative Learning 323
  • Abstract 323
  • References 332
  • Induction of Continuous Stimulus- Response Relations Kyunghee Koh David E. Meyer University of Michigan 333
  • Introduction 333
  • Author Note 340
  • References 340
  • Structural Evaluation of Analogies: What Counts? 341
  • References 348
  • Structural Representations of Music Performance 349
  • Introduction 349
  • Conclusions 354
  • Acknowledgements 355
  • References 355
  • A Logic for Emotions: A Basis for Reasoning about Commonsense Psychological Knowledge 357
  • References 363
  • Extracting Visual Information from Text: Using Captions to Label Human Faces in Newspaper Photographs 364
  • Introduction 364
  • Summary 369
  • References 369
  • Head-Driven Massively-Parallel Constraint Propagation: Head-Features and Subcategorization as Interacting Constraints in Associative Memory 372
  • Introduction 372
  • Conclusion 377
  • Acknowledgements 378
  • References 378
  • Virtual Memories and Massive Generalization in Connectionist Combinatorial Learning 380
  • Acknowledgments 386
  • Appendix - Experimental Parameters 386
  • References 387
  • Connectionist Variable-Binding by Optimization 388
  • Acknowledgements 394
  • References 395
  • Efficient Inference with Multi-Place Predicates and Variables in a Connectionist System 396
  • 6 - Conclusion 402
  • Acknowledgements 402
  • References 402
  • On the Nature of Children's Naive Knowledge 404
  • Introduction 404
  • Conclusions 410
  • References 410
  • Comparing Historical and Intuitive Explanations of Motion: Does "Naive Physics" Have a Structure? 412
  • Abstract 412
  • Conclusions 416
  • Acknowledgments 416
  • Bibliography 416
  • Qualitative Geometric Reasoning 418
  • Introduction 418
  • References 424
  • Scientific Reasoning Strategies in a Simulated Molecular Genetics Environment 426
  • Abstract 426
  • References 433
  • Acknowledgement 433
  • Learning Events in the Acquisition of Three Skills 434
  • Introduction 434
  • Conclusions 440
  • Acknowledgments 441
  • References 441
  • Perceptual Chunks in Geometry Problem Solving: A Challenge to Theories of Skill Acquisition 442
  • 1 - Introduction 442
  • References 449
  • Empirical Analyses of Self-Explanation and Transfer in Learning to Program 450
  • Introduction 450
  • References 457
  • Acknowledgements 457
  • Action Planning: Producing Unix Commands 458
  • Conclusions 465
  • References 465
  • Lexical Processing and the Mechanism of Context Effects in Text Comprehension 466
  • Conclusions 472
  • References 473
  • Pragmatic Interpretation and Ambiguity 474
  • Abstract 474
  • References 474
  • Conclusions 481
  • References 481
  • Expertise and Constraints in Interactive Sentence Processing 482
  • Introduction 482
  • Acknowledgements 489
  • References 489
  • Anomaly Detection Strategies for Schema-Based Story Understanding 490
  • Introduction 490
  • Conclusion 496
  • Acknowledgments 497
  • References 497
  • Expectation Verification: A Mechanism for the Generation of Meta Comments 498
  • Introduction 498
  • Conclusions 504
  • References 504
  • Toward a Unified Theory of Immediate Reasoning in Soar 506
  • Abstract 506
  • Conclusion 513
  • Acknowledgements 513
  • References 513
  • Toward a Soar Theory of Taking Instructions for Immediate Reasoning Tasks 514
  • Abstract 514
  • Conclusion 521
  • Acknowledgements 521
  • References 521
  • Tower-Noticing Triggers Strategy-Change in the Tower of Hanoi: A Soar Model 522
  • Conclusions 528
  • Acknowledgements 529
  • References 529
  • Learning Relative Attribute Weights for Instance-Based Concept Descriptions 530
  • Abstract 530
  • Acknowledgements 537
  • References 537
  • Selective Associations in Causality Judgments Ii: A Strong Causal Relationship May Facilitate Judgments of a Weaker One 538
  • Introduction 538
  • References 545
  • Representation and Acquisition of Knowledge of Functional Systems 546
  • Conclusions 551
  • References 552
  • Connectionism and Intentionality 553
  • Abstract 553
  • References 560
  • A Connectionist Model of Category Size Effects during Learning 561
  • Introduction 561
  • Conclusions 570
  • References 570
  • Acknowledgments 571
  • A Connectionist Model of Phonological Short-Term Memory 572
  • Introduction 572
  • Acknowledgements 578
  • References 578
  • Toward a Connectionist Model of Symbolic Emergence 580
  • Introduction 580
  • Acknowledgments 586
  • References 586
  • Coherence Relation Assignment K. Dahlgren Ibm/Los Angeles Scientific Center 588
  • Notes 596
  • References 596
  • A Model for Contextualizing Natural Language Discourse 597
  • Introduction 597
  • References 603
  • An Intelligent Tutoring System Approach to Teaching People How to Learn 605
  • Introduction 605
  • Conclusion 611
  • References 612
  • True and Pseudo Framing Effects Deborah Frisch University of Oregon 613
  • Introduction 613
  • References 618
  • Appendix 618
  • Question Answering in the Context of Causal Mechanisms 621
  • Abstract 621
  • References 626
  • Learning a Troubleshooting Strategy: the Roles of Domain Specific Knowledge and General Problem-Solving Strategies 627
  • Introduction 627
  • Conclusion 633
  • Bibliography 634
  • Representing Variable Information with Simple Recurrent Networks 635
  • Introduction 635
  • References 642
  • Device Representation for Modeling Improvisation in Mechanical Use Situations 643
  • Introduction 643
  • Conclusions 649
  • Acknowledgements 650
  • References 650
  • 'Confirmation Bias' in Rule Discovery and the Principle of Maximum Entropy 651
  • Introduction 651
  • Conclusion 657
  • Acknowledgements 657
  • References 657
  • Modeling of User Performance with Computer Access and Alternative Communication Systems for Handicapped People 659
  • Introduction 659
  • References 666
  • Focusing Your Rst: A Step toward Generating Coherent Multisentential Text 667
  • Abstract 667
  • References 673
  • Individual Differences in the Revision of an Abstract Knowledge Structure 675
  • Introduction 675
  • Acknowledgments 681
  • References 682
  • Ebl and Sbl: A Neural Network Synthesis Bruce F. Katz the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology University of Illinois 683
  • Introduction 683
  • Acknowledgements 688
  • References 688
  • Competition and Learning in a Connectionist Deterministic Parser 690
  • Introduction 690
  • Acknowledgements 696
  • References 697
  • Descartes: Development Environment for Simulating Hybrid Connectionist Architectures 698
  • Abstract 698
  • Conclusions 704
  • Acknowledgements 704
  • References 705
  • Frame Selection in a Connectionist Model of High-Level Inferencing 706
  • Introduction 706
  • Conclusions 713
  • Acknowledgements 713
  • References 713
  • A Symbolic/Connectionist Script Applier Mechanism 714
  • Abstract 714
  • References 720
  • Distributed Problem Solving: the Social Contexts of Learning and Transfer 722
  • Introduction 722
  • Summary 727
  • References 728
  • A Framework for Psychological Causal Induction: Integrating the Power and Covariation Views 729
  • Introduction 729
  • Acknowledgements 733
  • References 733
  • Lexical Vs. Nonlexical Cognitive Processing: is General Slowing Domain-Specific? 734
  • References 740
  • Does Function Provide a Core for Artifact Concepts? 741
  • Introduction 741
  • References 747
  • Planning in an Open World: A Pluralistic Approach 749
  • Abstract 749
  • Summary 756
  • References 756
  • Lexical Ambiguity Resolution in a Constraint Satisfaction Network 757
  • Introduction 757
  • Conclusion 763
  • References 763
  • Acknowledgement 764
  • The Role of Computational Temperature in a Computer Model of Concepts and Analogy-Making 765
  • Abstract 765
  • Acknowledgements 772
  • References 772
  • An Interactive Activation Model for Priming of Geographical Information 773
  • Introduction 773
  • References 779
  • Models for Interaction with an Intelligent Instructional System 781
  • Abstract 781
  • Conclusion 787
  • Acknowledgements 787
  • References 787
  • Abduction and World Model Revision 789
  • Abstract 789
  • Conclusion 795
  • Acknowledgements 795
  • References 796
  • A Linguistic Approach to the Problem of Slot Semantics 797
  • Abstract 797
  • Conclusion 803
  • References 803
  • Parsing and Representing Container Metaphors 805
  • Abstract 805
  • References 810
  • The Influence of Prior Theories on the Ease of Concept Acquisition 812
  • Introduction 812
  • Conclusions 818
  • Acknowledgements 819
  • Bibliography 819
  • Recognition of Melody Fragments in Continuously Performed Music 820
  • Introduction 820
  • Conclusions 826
  • Conclusions 826
  • Acknowledements 826
  • Computing Value Judgments during Story Understanding 828
  • Introduction 828
  • Conclusions 835
  • Conclusions 835
  • Acknowledgments 835
  • References 835
  • Dynamic Reinforcement Driven Error Propagation Networks with Application to Game Playing 836
  • Introduction 836
  • Conclusion 842
  • Acknowledgements 842
  • References 843
  • A Case for Symbolic/Sub-Symbolic Hybrids 844
  • Introduction 844
  • References 849
  • Neural Network Models of Memory Span 852
  • Introduction 852
  • References 858
  • The Lexical Distance Model and Word Priming 860
  • Conclusions 866
  • References 866
  • A Cooperative Model of Intuition and Reasoning for Natural Language Processing -- Microfeatures and Logic 868
  • Abstract 868
  • Conclusions 874
  • Acknowledgements 874
  • References 875
  • Reinterpretation and the Perceptual Microstructure of Conceptual Knowledge - Cognition Considered as a Perceptual Skill 876
  • Introduction 876
  • Acknowledgments 882
  • References 882
  • A Model of Natural Category Structure and Its Behavioral Implications 884
  • Introduction 884
  • Concluding Remarks 890
  • References 891
  • Qualitative and Quantitative Reasoning about Thermodynamics 892
  • 7 - Acknowledgements 899
  • An Approach to Constructing Student Models: Status Report for the Programming Domain 900
  • Abstract 900
  • References 907
  • Processing Unification-Based Grammars in a Connectionist Framework 908
  • Introduction 908
  • Conclusion 915
  • Conclusion 915
  • Acknowledgements 915
  • A Discrete Neural Network Model for Conceptual Representation and Reasoning 916
  • Abstract 916
  • 7 - Conclusion 921
  • References 921
  • Preattentive Indexing and Visual Counting: Finsts and the Enumeration of Concentric Items 924
  • References 931
  • Making Conversation Flexible1 932
  • Abstract 932
  • Conclusion 938
  • References 938
  • When Reactive Planning is Not Enough: Using Contextual Schemas to React Appropriately to Environmental Change 940
  • Abstract 940
  • Conclusion 946
  • Acknowledgements 947
  • References 947
  • Search in Analogical Reasoning 948
  • Abstract 948
  • Conclusions 955
  • Conclusions 955
  • Acknowledgements 955
  • Capturing Intuitions about Human Language Production 956
  • Abstract 956
  • References 963
  • Learning Semantic Relationships in Compound Nouns with Connectionist Networks 964
  • Introduction 964
  • Conclusions 970
  • References 971
  • The Role of Intermediate Abstractions in Understanding Science and Mathematics 972
  • Abstract 972
  • Conclusions 978
  • Acknowledgements 978
  • References 979
  • Learning from Examples: the Effect of Different Conceptual Roles 980
  • Introduction 980
  • References 986
  • Active Acquisition for User Modeling in Dialog Systems 987
  • Introduction 987
  • Conclusion 994
  • Acknowledgements 994
  • References 994
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