An Old Soldier's Campaign to Set the History Books Straight; CANADIANS RECORD THEIR PRECIOUS MEMORIES OF WARTIME SCOTLAND

Article excerpt

Byline: ANDREW HUNTER

WHEN Canadian Colonel Donald Thompson left Inveraray on the shores of Loch Fyne in 1942, he forever carried a piece of Scotland in his heart.

He was just 19 then, and a Company Sergeant with the No. 13 platoon of the Cameron Highlanders of Ottawa.

Along with 30,000 of his World War II comrades from all over Canada, he had trained at the Combined Operations Training Centre at Inveraray, Argyll, in preparation for the D-Day landing at Normandy on June 6, 1944.

As he entered Invera-ray Kirk yesterday, 55 years on, there was still evidence of a slight limp from the leg wound which cut short his active army career just two days after the landing.

After Colonel Thompson, 74, who now lives in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, was evacuated to London the forces tried to fend him off with a pen-pusher's job, but he quickly tired of writing reports.

*asked for a replacement and was soon back in action, this time in Holland.

However, the wound flared up again and he was ordered home to Canada.

But his memories of Scotland, and his family's Scots military ancestry which goes back generations, always drew him back to 'the old country'. …