Books Received

Article excerpt

SEARCHING FOR YELLOWSTONE: ECOLOGY AND WONDER IN THE LAST WILDERNESS

Paul Schullery. 225 North Roberts, P.O. Box 201201, Helena, Montana 59620-1201: Montana Historical Society Press, April 2004. (800) 243-9900. www.montanahistoricalsociety.org. ISBN 0-9721522-1-0. 360 pp. $19.95 Softbound.

Searching for Yellowstone traces Yellowstone National Park's social and ecological history from the Pleistocene to the present in a work originally published in 1996. The Montana Historical Society Press's new edition contains a preface updating readers on recent developments in Yellowstone. Covering a range of topics--from grizzly bears to geysers, from microbiology to bison--Schullery ties these together in a comprehensive understanding of the ecology, conservation, and economic significance of the park. Searching for Yellowstone contains over thirty illustrations and photographs depicting the elegance, mystery, and beauty of Yellowstone Park.

Paul Schullery is a former Yellowstone Park employee and former director of the American Museum of Fly Fishing.

FORESTS IN TIME: THE ENVIRONMENTAL CONSEQUENCES OF 1,000 YEARS OF CHANGE IN NEW ENGLAND

Edited by David R. Foster and John D. Aber. P.O. Box 209040, New Haven, Connecticut 06520-9040: Yale University Press, March 2004. (203) 432-0964. www.yalebooks.com. ISBN 0-300-09235-0. 496 pp. $45.00 Clothbound.

Leading biological, physical, and social scientists contributed to Forests in Time--a book demonstrating that an understanding of landscape history is essential for the study of ecology and environmental management. The research that forms the basis of the book was conducted in central Massachusetts at Harvard Forest--one of 25 national centers for ecological research funded by the National Science Foundation.

Although New England is one of the most heavily forested regions of the United States today, this was not always the case. The authors examine how 1,000 years of both natural and man-made influences have affected the ecosystem. They analyze the legacy of land use embedded in the stone walls, empty cellar holes, wood paths, and abandoned railroad beds throughout the region; they draw upon clues in the soils, streams, ponds, and forests to discover previous land use practices through time and show how land use has affected vegetation, wildlife, and ecosystem structures.

David R. Foster is a professor of biology at Harvard University and director of the Harvard Forest and its Long-Term Ecological Research program.

John D. Aver is a professor in the Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans and Space, as well as in the Department of Natural Resources at the University of New Hampshire. Aver also serves as a principal investigator for the Harvard Forest and Hubbard Brook Long-Term Ecosystem.

AN INTERNATIONAL REGIME FOR MARITIME SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH

Montserrat Gorina-Ysern. 410 Saw Mill River Road, Ardsley, New York 10502-2615: Transnational Publishers, Inc., 2004. (914) 693-5100. www.transnationalpubs.com. ISBN 1-57105-213-5. 650 pp. $165.00 Hardcover.

An International Regime for Maritime Scientific Research provides a comprehensive and multi-disciplinary study of lingering North-South disagreements on the scope of regulations, and how unprecedented marine science, methodology, and technological developments exacerbate those disagreements. The book explores means to encourage greater cooperation and negotiation in marine scientific research.

In investigating marine biomedical research and bio-prospecting, the book underscores the convergence of domestic laws in different continents, the Law of the Sea Convention, the Convention on Biological Diversity, and TRIPS under the WTO regime. It shows how bio-genetic and biological research can lead to the development of a multi-billion dollar industry in pharmacological drugs and assesses economic rights that accrue in developing nations in whose jurisdictional waters bio-prospecting occurs. …