Scanning Your Health's Horizon; APRIVATE CT SCREENING COSTS THE SAME AS PUTTING A CAR THROUGH AN MOT, BUT IT CAN GIVE EARLY WARNING OF CANCER ANDOTHER SERIOUS ILLNESSES, OR REASSURE YOU THAT EVERYTHING'S FINE

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Byline: By Maria Croce

AFTER losing both his parents to cancer, retired quantity surveyor Rob Stanger was worried he was at risk.

Then when his cousin died of bowel cancer six months ago, Rob decided he wanted a health check. So the 65-year-old from Glasgow became one of the first to book in to give his body anMOT at a new private scanning centre in the city.

Lifescan claims its hi-tech equipment can spot killer cancers and heart disease early or offer peace of mind for those given the all-clear.

The firm has treated 14,000 patients at its centres in England and doctors say it has already helped save many lives by detecting conditions early.

Now Lifescan's CT scanner has come to Scotland where staff hope it will help identify serious problems early enough for live-saving treatment.

Screenings cost from pounds 100 for a bone-density scan up to pounds 750 for a full body scan and virtual colonoscopy, with results available in three to four working days. It's non-invasive and takes minutes.

The system is mainly aimed at people over 40 because they're considered to be most at risk. It can detect early signs of heart disease, colon cancer, lung cancer, aneurysms, osteoporosis and other illnesses.

Rob said he was determined to see his grandchildren grow up, so wanted to ensure he wasn't suffering from any serious conditions.

"I just wanted to find out if everything was okay, even though I have quite a healthy lifestyle and don't smoke," he said.

"My father smoked and he died of lung cancer at 73. My mother died of bowel cancer and she was well on in years as well.

"But you just don't know what's happening with your health, so I thought it would be a good idea to have a scan."

Some of his friends have been diagnosed with cancer and so Rob began to wonder whether he had any hidden problems.

"Then I lost my cousin to bowel cancer six months ago and she was only 60," he said. ""That's what finally made me decide this is what I wanted to do.

"I feel I've got a good few years yet If I thought I only had a couple of years, I'd spend the money on something else.

"I enjoy travelling and playing golf. I haven't thought about passing away, I like to think I have an optimistic outlook on life.

"I wanted peace of mind or if there's anything wrong, at least it would be found early."

Rob doesn't have private medical insurance, but decided to use his savings to get the reassurance of knowing his health was good. His wife Patricia, 66, is also planning a scan.

Rob has now been given the all-clear and has been told he doesn't need another check for five years. "I was told everything was normal which is a big relief," he said. "If there had been anything to be concerned about, I would have wanted to try to do something about it. …