A Personal History of the NHS: Kenneth Calman Looks Back over the Past 60 Years Describing the Impact That the NHS Has Had on Him

Article excerpt

I was born a few years before the NHS began and have been part of its progress over the past 60 years. For me, it has been part of my life, and it has saved my life. This is a personal history from someone who has been a patient, a carer, a professional and policy-maker.

My first introduction to the health service, at the age of nine, was the death of my father, aged 41, from a heart attack. He was a heavy smoker and his death occurred a few months after Richard Doll first published his key work on cigarette smoking and health. His death had a profound effect on me and, as my interest in medicine grew, it was clear that this event could have been avoided, or treated more appropriately.

Fifty-five years later, in 2008, I had an aortic valve replaced in the same hospital. I received impressive care from high-quality staff--from the surgeons, anaesthetists, nurses, dieticians and physiotherapists, and the whole, wonderful team.

What has changed in between? What would have happened to my father now? The increased range and effectiveness of treatments and diagnostic developments has been quite astonishing. In my own professional lifetime, I have been involved in transplantation, cancer therapy, palliative care and public health. In each of these areas, the outcomes for patients are now just so much better. And these are just in the fields I have been involved in. Other changes in childhood illnesses, child birth, heart disease, and mental health have been equally impressive.

The healthcare team is now well established, with the contribution of a wide range of professionals well recognised. Managing resources and making the best use of skills and expertise is now part of the ethos.

The involvement of patients and the public is critical, as I learned in my time as a professor of oncology. Patients and their families have so much to offer. We need their help.

The community-based specialties, including general practice and primary care, community child health and mental health, have been major successes. The management of the NHS has changed many times. Indeed, I have suggested that on formal occasions we might wear our campaign medals, for the reforms we have been part of: 1974, 1984, 1989 and so on. Quality issues now dominate the agenda. Patients and the public want to know what will happen to them, what the outcome will be, and how that compares to other places. The watchwords are evidence-based, outcome-focused and quality-driven. Individual choice is important, and for some, quality, of life may be just as important as length of life.

One of the most significant aspects of the past 60 years has been a huge improvement in public health. …