Eternal Vigilance: Throughout the 1940s, George Orwell Was Formulating the Ideas about Language and Politics That Found Their Ultimate Expression in Nineteen Eighty-Four. the Novelist and Critic Keith Gessen Celebrates Orwell's Essays from This Period-A Plain-Spoken Pleasure, despite Their Contradictions

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George Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four was first published 60 years ago this month. Much of its distinctive vocabulary--"Newspeak", "doublethink", "thoughtcrime" and the rest-took up residence in the English vernacular long before programme-makers decided to name a TV reality show after Big Brother, the novel's malevolent presiding intelligence. The source of Nineteen Eighty-Four's enduring power lies not so much in the accuracy of its dystopian premonitions as in the starkness of the warning it contains: that the ability of language to describe the world as it really is will always be vulnerable to the distortions and evasions of ideology and power.

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By 1940, George Orwell had behind him four conventional "social" novels and, more significantly, three books of documentary reportage, each one better than the last, culminating in his classic account of the Spanish Civil War, Homage to Catalonia. Gradually in the others but culminating in Homage, Orwell perfected his signature "plain" style, which so resembles someone speaking honestly and without pretence directly to you, and he had more or less settled on his political opinions: "Every line of serious work that I have written since 1936 has been written, directly or indirectly, against totalitarianism and for democratic socialism, as I understand it." So he said in 1946.

But while this may have been settled, there were other matters Orwell was still working out in his mind. The subjects of the essays Orwell wrote in the 1940s are almost all, in one way or another, things Orwell doesn't like. The essays are incessantly self-contradicting. First, Orwell declares that no great novel could now be written from a Catholic (or communist) perspective; later he allows that a novel could be written from such a perspective, in a pinch; and then, in his essay on Graham Greene, he comes very near to suggesting that only Catholics can now write novels. In his essay on T S Eliot, he writes that it is "fashionable to say that in verse only the words count and 'meaning' is irrelevant, but in fact every poem contains a prose-meaning, and when the poem is any good it is a meaning which the poet urgently wishes to express. All art is to some extent propaganda." Several years later, in "The Prevention of Literature", in arguing for the idea that poetry might survive totalitarianism while prose would not, he writes that "what the poet is saying--that is, what his poem 'means' if translated into prose--is relatively unimportant even to himself". What is particularly frustrating about these contradictions is that at each successive moment Orwell presents them in his great style, his wonderful sharp-edged plain-spoken style, which makes you feel that there is no way on earth you could possibly disagree with him, unless you're part of the pansy left, or a sandal-wearer and fruit-juice drinker, or maybe just a crank.

In a way I'm exaggerating, because the rightness of Orwell on a number of topics has been an albatross around his neck for 60 years. In truth, Orwell was wrong about all sorts of things, not least the inner logic of totalitarianism: he thought a mature totalitarian system would so deform its citizenry that they would not be able to overthrow it. This was the nightmare vision of Nineteen Eighty-Four. In fact, as it turned out in Russia, even the ruling elite was not willing to maintain mature totalitarianism after Stalin's death.

Other totalitarian regimes have repeated the pattern. Orwell was wrong and Orwell contradicted himself. He was more insightful about the distant dangers of communist thought-control, in the Soviet Union, than the more pressing thought-control of western consumerism. Nor did he see the sexual revolution coming, not by a long shot; one wonders what the too-frequent taunter of the "pansy left" would have made of the fact that the gay movement was one of the most successful, because most militant, of the post-1960s liberation struggles. …