Reading Recommendations for the Low-Skilled

Article excerpt

Create an English language – learning environment in the classroom.If possible, provide a comfortable, attractive, inviting and cozy area for reading - (bean bags, rugs, cushions, easy-chairs). Ensure the room lighting is suitable for reading. Display literature-related posters and pictures. Encourage learners to display their drawings of characters and the various highlights from books they have read on a pin board.Establish a classroom library. Build a library of books that supports various reading skill levels and interest areas as well as different genre, e.g. fiction, non-fiction, poetry, drama, comedy, historical, futuristic - comics, etc. Have a regular time each week that is library time - a time when learners browse the books in the class library or the school library.Show students how to use the library by teaching how to find titles, authors and genre sections using the display system and the card catalogue system or computer database. Children who are constantly surrounded by literature are more likely to read books.Adopt a “Let Them Choose” policy regarding books and topics. Without limiting the need to experience various genre, and while being vigilant about monitoring for objectionable content, children should be allowed a high degree of control over their reading selections.Promote reading firstly as an enjoyable experience, secondly as a means of gaining knowledge, e.g. how to make a kite, etc. and finally, as a directed task to find information.Gradually expose students to the different genres in literature. Expand each reader’s range of fiction - adventure, fantasy, mystery, science fiction, historical fiction. Read and share poetry and humorousselections to the class and show and talk about non-fiction books on animals and nature, biographies, autobiographies, historical as well as on scientific and exploratory works.Build a selection of books that have VCDs, CDs and tapes that narrate popular stories. Children with major reading difficulties benefit from “hearing” while “reading”, i.e. listening to an audio version of the story as they “read” and follow in the book. This allows them to associate the words and meaning and gives a sense of personal fulfilment that they have read a book even though it has not been done independently. Promote shared and guided reading experiences with small groups of students.Set aside regular times in the class for free and group reading. …