Alphabet Street

Article excerpt

In Enigmisticamaurius (4-11-99), blogger Marius Serra wrote a review of my book Alphabet Avenue (Chicago Review Press, 1997), in Castilian Spanish. I could read some of it in Spanish, but to really understand it, I used a translation program to convert it to English. The results were truly phenomenol. Here's the review verbatim, as copied from Serra's website:

The U.S. publishing industry has booked a space wide enough for books devoted to language games. Alongside the classic collections of the most popular methods (palindromes, anagrams, xarades "PUNS" ...) occasionally appeared something new that draws ludolinguistic plankton. One of the most remarkable books which has appeared in reent years is "Alphabet Street" by Dave Morice (Chicago Review Press, 1997), easily trobable at macrollibreries virtual Internet. Morice s'empesca a "City of Word Games" with its main boulevards (Direction, Sound, alphabet) and a bunch of streets: Anagram Boulevard Pangrammatic Highway Viaduct Visual Word Square Palindrome Place Dictionary Drive ...

Apart from a plethora of examples provides some tasty touches Morice historiography often located in a recreational linguistics narrative. And not just because documented writers have used these devices to build works of interest, but because "Alphabet Street" also includes some stories that project the territory ludolinguistic literary tradition of fantasy. Stories of episodes that are germs of novels waiting to be fond of any n'infecti. One of those stories that develops Morice is a tragic story of a seventeenth century French Pujon named Andre who died because of the words.

Morice tells that succumbed to the charms Pujon the onomancia and was dedicated in his name anagramitzar compulsively, with results quite different, until one day he found that ten letters of Andre Pujon could make the phrase "Pendu a Rion, on the understanding that he considered equivalent as is usually done with Latin, J and I Pujon of Rion. …