Being Beautiful, Inside and Out

Article excerpt

When someone tells you that “you’re beautiful,” what does it really mean? Does it insinuate that you have a model-like svelte figure, or perhaps a curvaceous body with ample bosom and hips? Or maybe it’s about your flawless, zit-free face? Does being beautiful entail fair complexion, slim silhouette, and everything aesthetically physical? When it comes to beauty, is it really in the eye of the beholder? Are there objective criteria for the evaluation of beauty? Even before civilization started, human beings already have the concept of beauty. They possessed the ability to realize that some things are pleasing and attractive than others. But through time, the concept of beauty changed and even became more abstract. Women have endeavored to change their body to conform to what society dictates to be beautiful. Each culture has different beauty ideals. What may be considered beautiful to one might be appalling to another.Take for example the Kayan and Padaung tribes from the border region of Myanmar and Thailand. Since their early childhood, the women wear brass coils, or neck rings, to elongate their necks. The more elongated the neck, the more beautiful the woman is. In the late 19th century, the voluptuous and round-figured women were the standard of beauty. While in the 1920s, super thin flappers (new breed of young women during that era) were “in.” Curvaceous pin-up girls were in vogue during the 1940s to 1950s. Super-thin models made a comeback during the 1960s. Nowadays, although women still aspire to be skinny, the standard of beauty emphasizes on being healthy and toned. And it doesn’t help that most product advertisements have shifting messages about what is beautiful.Dove Philippines has helped shape the concept of beauty in its own way… in a good way, that is. For the past ten years, it has embarked on a serious and deliberate mission to inspire women to take another look at themselves as creations of natural and real beauty. …