Green Job Hunting: Matching Your Skills with Available Green Jobs

Article excerpt

In the wake of ever-present unemployment following the 2008 recession, looking for a job can be stressful. For those who are either entering the workforce for the first time or re-entering it, finding a job is especially difficult. But if you're on the hunt, and want to indulge your green leanings, too, there are online green job sites that can get you on the right path.

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The Green Job Basics

The United States Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) began to study green jobs in 2010. The first definition they gave is a job that produces a good or service that helps the environment or protects natural resources. The second is a job that makes the processes of a company more environmentally friendly or decreases the use of natural resources.

Dixie Sommers, the assistant commissioner for occupational statistics and employment projections in the BLS, says that the bureau looked at both how the economy operates and the general way that they measure employment to arrive at the definition.

According to the bureau, there are 3.1 million jobs in the U.S. that can be considered "green," accounting for about 2.4% of all wage and salary employment in the United States. "The catch is that not every business in every one of those industries produces green goods and services," Sommers says. In September, the website will feature a third piece of data about specific environmentally friendly occupations.

Start Searching

Green job websites abound online. Here are a few places to get started:

* The U.S. Department of Labor's Employment and Training Administration has a lot of resources on green jobs, including job opportunities, other governmental organizations and information on training and certification. All of the links are available at doleta.gov/brg/greenjobs.

* For those with technical inclinations, the U.S. Green Building Council's website offers information on how to get accreditation before applying for green jobs specific to the building industry. "By 2013, green buildings will support nearly 8 million workers in a range of occupations including construction managers, carpenters, electricians, architects, truck drivers and cost estimators, among many others," they write on their site. Check out the Green Building Education section at usgbc.org/greenjobs.

* The site eco.org includes a blog, a place to post resumes and a job search. …