Republican Party Must Remain for Life, against Abortion; National Moral Crisis Requires Leadership

Article excerpt

Byline: Kristan Hawkins, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Not surprisingly, in the immediate aftermath of President Obama's win over Mitt Romney last week, many Republicans bared their fangs at the social-conservative wing of the party, either subtly or not so subtly, blaming the loss on those who vote our values. Now, more than ever, our party needs to hold onto our pro-life, pro-human-rights values. In fact, the Republican Party should become more fiercely aligned to the pro-life position than ever.

Despite what you may have heard from the Democratic National Convention, it's not an unpopular position. More than half of our country identifies as pro-life, including the majority of women and young people. Hispanics, Latinos and blacks are overwhelmingly pro-life and support traditional family values. One of the major problems of the Republican Party is our infrastructure. The relationships to large minority voting populations, which ironically support many conservative social principles, are not in place, and in the end, that severely hurts the conservative movement.

During the months before the election, I traveled to many college campuses and talked to young people about voting according to their pro-life convictions. My organization, Students for Life of America, works with more than 700 groups on campuses across the United States. Our team travels most of the year, forming key relationships with these human rights leaders, getting to know them and their members and training them in how to be effective grass-roots activists. They know how to talk to other students about the issues they care about and how the life issue in particular is of utmost importance to their future and the future of the nation.

We believe ending legal abortion in our lifetime is possible, and we hold the great abolitionists of the past, such as William Wilberforce, an English politician who led the movement to abolish the slave trade in Great Britain, in high esteem and aim to mimic their fighting spirit in the midst of seemingly impossible adversity. …