South African Communists' Friends in High Places: The ANC-Communist Party Regime Came to Power in South Africa with Western Aid, despite the Regime's Atrocious History

Article excerpt

The tragedy unfolding in South Africa as genocide and communism march onward should not be surprising. Such events may shock Americans who have relied on the establishment press for information, but that the once-prosperous nation would eventually sink to this point was easy to foresee even before the African National Congress (ANC) and South African Communist Party (SACP) alliance regime began to take over. The decades-old communist domination of the ANC was widely documented long before it came to power.

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ANC leader and new South Africa's first president Nelson Mandela was not persecuted for his "political" beliefs, the widely accepted myths about Mandela notwithstanding. He was actually put in jail for admitting that he planned sabotage to violently bring down the government and crush South Africa under communist rule. It was hardly a secret, though the Western establishment did its best to conceal the facts from the world.

"We communist party members are the most advanced revolutionaries in modern history," Mandela proclaimed in a document later used when he was prosecuted for sabotage and treason. "The people of South Africa, led by the South African Communist Party, will destroy capitalist society and build in its place socialism." In the 1980s, Mandela was repeatedly offered the opportunity to get out of prison if he would just renounce violence. He refused.

Meanwhile, the communist revolutionary's wife at the time, Winnie Mandela, became notorious for endorsing brutal mob executions where tires filled with gasoline were placed around the victims' necks and set ablaze--a savage tactic used by the predominantly black ANC against pro-government blacks before the new regime took power. The ghastly spectacle, known as "necklacing," was aimed at punishing ANC opponents and dissuading other blacks from standing against it. "Together, hand-in-hand with our sticks of matches, with our necklaces we shall liberate this country," Winnie declared.

The ANC, meanwhile, was listed as a terrorist group as late as 1988 by the U.S. Congress, which had previously documented its control by communist forces. "No major decision could be taken by the ANC without the concurrence and approval of the Central Committee of the South African Communist Party," former ANC and SACP leader Bartholomew Hlapane testified before the U.S. Congress. Less than a year later, he and his wife were executed by an assassin using a Soviet-made AK-47.

Brought to Power

Despite what was already known about the ANC and the SACP, the ruling regime in South Africa has had friends in high places for decades--since long before it came to power, actually. Among the communist powers supporting the alliance were the regimes ruling the Soviet Union, Cuba, Libya, Mozambique, and Zimbabwe. Those forces and others, by helping to arm and train Marxist terrorist groups and front organizations, provided key "pressure from below" to force the South African government's surrender.

When he was in the South African military decades ago, Andre Vandenberg, who now lives in the United States, learned a lot about the communist subversion behind the scenes. "We would attack a base and we would get ANC members, but when you get past that line of defense, you get into the Russians, East Germans, and Cubans," he told THE NEW AMERICAN. When probed further, Vandenberg walked away and returned with binoculars. "These are binoculars I took off an East German," he explained, pointing to the German writing. They were made in the East German city of Jena.

Communist powers alone, however, were not enough to bring the ANC and SACP to power, "All of the AK-47s, mortars, bombs, Soviet advisers, terrorist training camps, assassinations, demonstrations, and biased broadcasts of these revolutionists combined could not, of themselves, have brought about the transformation in South Africa of a vicious terrorist group and its titular head from the status of political outlaws to that of global cult heroes and de facto heads of state," THE NEW AMERICAN'S William F. …