We Must Defend the BBC from Murdoch and Death by a Thousand Tory Cuts

Article excerpt

Rule one of politics, as Barack Obama's former chief of staff Rahm Emanuel once remarked, is: "Never allow a crisis to go to waste." Right-wingers in the UK have heeded his words: they certainly aren't allowing the crises engulfing the BBC "to go to waste". And their strategy is as brazen as it is cynical and opportunistic: to magnify and exaggerate the sins of the hated Beeb while quietly minimising the crimes of their friends at News International.

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A case in point was Boris Johnson's Telegraph column of 12 November. After blithely declaring that the "real tragedy" was the "smearing [of] an innocent man's name" by BBC's Newsnight (and not, as you might think, the sexual abuse of children), Johnson claimed that Newsnight's reporting had been "more cruel, revolting and idiotic than anything perpetrated by the News of the World".

Sorry, what? Dare I remind the Mayor of London that more than 4,000 people have been identified by police as possible victims of phone-hacking, including the families of dead British soldiers, relatives of the 7/7 victims and a murdered schoolgirl? Yet the cultural vandals on the right only have eyes for the BBC, whose existence has always been anathema to their free-market, anti-regulation ideology.

Hysteria and hyperbole

The Newsnight debacle has provided the perfect cover for an attack on the corporation that has been a long time in the making. Remember, in opposition, the Conservative Party in effect allowed James Murdoch and NewsCorp lobbyists to write its media policy. And on coming to office, the Tory-led coalition froze the BBC licence fee for six years. An unavoidable cost-cutting measure, perhaps? Not quite: a gleeful David Cameron let the mask slip when he referred to the BBC "deliciously" having to slash its budget. (For the record, the BBC costs each licensed household less than 40p a day.)

In recent weeks, conservatives--both big and small "c"--have queued up to denounce the broadcaster and demand that it be downsized or even broken up. "The BBC must do less, and do it better," declaimed the Telegraph on 13 November. The Defence Secretary, the Conservative Philip Hammond, suggested in (where else?) a BBC radio interview that the future of the licence fee might be in doubt.

What we are witnessing is a shameless, coordinated assault on the BBC's reputation and output by Conservative politicians and by their outriders in the right-wing media echo chamber. Don't believe me? Ask yourself: where were these doughty Tory defenders of media ethics when Christopher Jefferies, the landlord of the murdered architect Joanna Yeates, was being smeared as a "creepy" killer by the press? Eight newspapers, including the Sun, the Mirror and the Daily Mail, had to pay "substantial" libel damages to the former schoolmaster. None of those papers' editors quit his job; none "stood aside" from his post pending an independent inquiry.

It is also worth asking why so few Tory MPs and Tory-supporting columnists have gone after ITV--the network on which the presenter Phillip Schofield idiotically ambushed the Prime Minister, live on air, with a list of alleged paedophiles culled from the internet. …