Feminism Is the One F-Word That Makes Eyes Widen in Polite Company

Article excerpt

What is it about the word "feminism" that frightens people so much? In recent months, as I've travelled around the world giving talks about and-capitalism and women's rights, I've had the same conversation countless times: men telling me, "I'm not a feminist, I'm an equalist." Or young women, explaining that despite believing in the right to equal pay for equal work, despite opposing sexual violence, despite believing in a woman's right to every freedom men have enjoyed for centuries, they are not feminists. They are something else, something that's very much like a feminist but doesn't involve having to say the actual word.

"Feminism" is the one F-word that really will make eyes widen in polite company. Saying it implies you might have demands that can't be met by waiting politely for some man in charge to make the world a little bit fairer. It's a word that suggests dissatisfaction, even anger--and if there's one thing that a nice girl isn't supposed to be, it's angry.

Often, fear of the word "feminism" comes from women ourselves. In many years of activism, I've frequently heard it suggested that feminism simply needs to "rebrand"; to find a better, more soothing way of asking that women and girls should be treated like human beings rather than drudges or brainless sex toys. It's a typical solution for the age of PR and the politics of the focus group: just put a fluffy spin on feminism and you'll be able to sell it to the sceptics. It turns out, however, that while a watered-down vision of women's empowerment can be used to flog shoes, chocolate and dull jobs in the service sector, real-life feminist politics--which involves giving women and girls control over our lives and bodies--is much tougher to sell.

Whatever you choose to call it, practical equal rights for women will always be a terrifying prospect for those worried about the loss of male privilege. It's no wonder that "feminism" is still stereotyped as an aggressive movement, full of madwomen dedicated to the destruction of the male sex and who will not rest until they can breakfast on roasted testicles. It should be obvious that, as the feminist writer bell hooks puts it, "Most people learn about feminism from patriarchal mass media." As a result, most people remain confused about what the fight for gender liberation ultimately means.

Outlets such as tabloid newspapers, men's magazines and sitcoms pound out a stream of stereotypes about feminism. It fascinates us, men and women alike, precisely because its ultimate demands for redistribution of power and labour are so enormous. The stereotypes invariably focus on the pettiest of details: an article about whether or not it is "feminist" for a woman to shave her armpits is guaranteed to drive a lot of traffic to the website of any ailing newspaper--but less so one about the lack of pension provision for female part-time workers.

Stereotypes of this sort are effective for a reason: they target some of our most intimate fears about what gender equality might mean. …