If We Arm the Syrian Rebels, How Do We Stop British Bombs and Bullets Getting to Al-Qaeda?

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Is it too late to stop Syria's descent into hell? Since the uprising against the despotic Bashar al-Assad began in March 2011, 70,000 people have lost their lives, one million refugees have fled across the border into the neighbouring countries of Jordan, Lebanon and Turkey, and four million Syrians--a fifth of the population--have been internally displaced. In recent days, the Assad regime has been accused of using chemical weapons in Aleppo and the rebels tried (but failed) to assassinate the Syrian prime minister in Damascus.

The popular uprising long ago morphed into an armed insurgency, backed by a motley alliance of the United States, Europe, Turkey, the Gulf states and ... al-Qaeda. Syria, a secular state, has been engulfed in the flames of a vicious, sectarian civil war in which both sides want to kill their way to victory. Viable solutions of the diplomatic, non-violent variety are few and far between. "Syria poses the most complex set of issues that anyone could ever conceive," declared General Martin Dempsey, chairman of the US military's Joint Chiefs of Staff, in March.

The clamour for a military intervention in Syria is getting louder--especially following the (as yet unsubstantiated) chemical weapons claims. On the right, there's the US senator and Republican former presidential candidate John McCain, who, in recent years, hasn't come across a war he didn't want the US to fight. The Obama administration, McCain told NBC on 28 April, should arm the rebels, impose a no-fly zone and "be prepared with an international force to go in and secure these stocks of chemical and perhaps biological weapons".

On the left, there's the French philosopher Bernard-Henri Levy, one of the driving forces behind Nato's 2011 war in Libya. In an interview with me for al-Jazeera English, which will be broadcast in June, he said "there is no question" that a military intervention in Syria, beginning with a no-fly zone, is "doable". When I asked him how he could be so confident, he shrugged: "Bashar al-Assad is weak ... a paper tiger."

If only. Assad may be a loathsome dictator but that doesn't change a central fact: that he continues to command the support of a significant chunk of Syria's population (Alawites, Christians, some secular Sunnis). Nor does it change his air defences, which are far superior to those of Muammar al-Gaddafi, Saddam Hussein and Mullah Omar. Syria is believed to have up to 300 mobile surface-to-air missile systems and about 600 fixed missile sites. Oh, and did I mention the chemical weapons?

The experts are much more honest about the limits of military action than the Levys and McCains of this world. Dempsey, America's top soldier, has said that he can't see a military option that would "create an understandable outcome". His opposite number in the UK, General Sir David Richards, the chief of the defence staff, has told ministers, "Even to set up a humanitarian safe area would be a major military operation," according to the Sunday Times of 28 April. …