Sweet Valet High: The American Love Affair with Downton Abbey

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Until recently in the United States, the costume drama was a minority taste. Merchant Ivory adaptations of 19th-century novels and the imported British series shown on US public television's Masterpiece Theatre have long been regarded as the fusty province of wistful former English majors and the sort of matron who tours stately homes in white athletic shoes, marvelling over the lifestyles of the rich and historical.

Then came Downton Abbey, the object of almost as much fascination as the Harry Potter books before it. The drama, which debuted in the US in 2011, was the highest-rated cable or broadcast show when its third-series finale aired in February this year, reaching 12.3 million viewers and becoming the most popular drama in the history of the Public Broadcasting Service. It has a remarkably broad appeal. The celebrities who claim to be obsessed with it include the late-night talk-show hosts Conan O'Brien, jimmy Fallon and Craig Ferguson, the comedian Patton Oswalt (who live-tweets each episode), the country star Reba McEntire and the singer Katy Perry, as well as bona fide film stars such as Harrison Ford (who has hinted that he would consider a role in the programme) and the hip-hop singers Jay Electronica and Sean "Diddy" Combs.

The last example may raise eyebrows, but Diddy did make a hilarious parody video for the website Funny or Die, in which he was inserted into various scenes from the series playing an invented character, Lord Wolcott. He professes to be an "Abbey-head", but since he pronounces it "Downtown Abbey", the sincerity of that claim is subject to some doubt. If Diddy really is an Abbey-head, he's got plenty of company. There has been an Abbey-themed promo spot for The Simpsons (Simpton Abbey, in which a pink-glazed doughnut was placed on a china plate with silver tongs) and more parody videos than you can count, including a drag version, a Breaking Bad version (produced by the satirical TV pundit Stephen Colbert), a Sesame Street version, The Fresh Prince of Downton Abbey and, naturally, a "Harlem Shake" version. Michelle Obama is such a fan that last autumn she requested advance DVDs of the third series from ITV and invited two of the show's stars, Hugh Bonneville and Elizabeth McGovern, to the White House.

Why do Americans love Downton Abbey so much? More than one Brit has asked me this before carefully explaining that, in the UK, the series is viewed not as top-drawer drama, but rather as the British equivalent of American prime-time soaps such as Dynasty. Don't we realise that? In fact, we do--well, many of us do--and we relish the camp element of Downton Abbey, which is why there are all those parodies. But yes, there are other Americans who think of it as their foray into "classy" entertainment (as Harrison Ford called it), because it's full of fancy English people, is set in the past and airs on public television. That the show appeals to different audiences in different ways is surely one of the secrets of its success.

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Perhaps the most benighted critics are those would-be arbiters anxious to inform the rest of us that mistaking this sort of thing for art just won't do. Hendrik Hertzberg of the New Yorker welcomed the rather glum BBC adaptation of Ford Madox Ford's Parade's End starring Benedict Cumberbatch with hurrahs, averring that he could not "stomach" Downton Abbey, on account of "its blizzards of anachronisms, its absurd soap--operatics, and its Oprah--style oversharing between aristos and servants".

Cumberbatch similarly dismissed Downton as a "nostalgia trip" that was "fucking atrocious". Daniel Day-Lewis says he's never watched it because "that is why I left England" and Jeremy Irons has likened it to a Ford Fiesta, which "will get you there and give you a good time" but not much more. (This from a star of The Borgias!) Irons hopes Downton Abbey will serve as a gateway drug to Shakespeare, apparently assuming that viewers might never otherwise be exposed to the Bard but now they've got a load of Lady Mary, it's a slippery slope to King Lear. …