Attack of the CyberNats, a Psychic Crocodile and What the Polls Tell Us about Ukip Voters

Article excerpt

Swarms over Scotland

They warned me but would I listen? Publish a poll of Scots, they said, and you will incur the wrath of the CyberNats. Those who have not had reason to wade into Scottish politics will be mercifully unaware of the CyberNat--a species of online political activist whose nationalist fervour impels them to descend on any opponent (or perceived opponent) with terrifying e-ferocity.

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Earlier this month, I published some research which found that most Scots were unsure which responsibilities lay with the Scottish Parliament and which remained with Westminster; that most thought taxes and debt would rise if Holyrood were given more powers; and that a majority continued to oppose independence. For CyberNats, this sort of thing is heresy; it just cannot be allowed. They unleashed a swarm of tweets, which made lucid and reasoned arguments and raised some constructive psephological points, such as: "Why don't you just f*** off out of our affairs? Commission a nasty wee poll on that, you w*****." With such fearsome debaters ranged against it, how ever will the Union survive?

Spot the difference

In February, the New Statesman generously declared me the "nation's pollster-in-chief", a title I have been doing my best to live up to. One of the most telling findings in my recent research concerns the "Go home or face arrest" vans, launched by the government in a bold move to tackle illegal immigration/a shameful ploy to pander to prejudice (delete as applicable). I found that the people who most overwhelmingly approved of the initiative were, at the same time, the least likely to think it would work. Who were this group? Yes: Ukip voters.

This may not be quite everything you need to know about those attracted to Nigel Farage's party but there is something revealing in their strength of support for what they evidently regarded as a heroically pointless gesture. My latest poll in Tory-held marginal seats found that although Labour's vote share had stagnated since 2011, Tory defectors to Ukip could open the door to No 10 for Ed Miliband. Yet the evidence suggests that when it comes to winning back Ukip voters, the challenge for the other parties is to persuade them what any government does will make any difference at all. Their apparent willingness to vote for a party that is unlikely to win even a single seat is largely born of the view that it doesn't matter who is in charge. David Cameron, Ed Miliband and Nick Clegg have just under 20 months to persuade them it matters a great deal.

What voters want

People are still sometimes baffled why I do all this polling--and why, having done it, I make it available to everyone, including the Tories' opponents. The answer is that my political stance and my research are, in effect, separate. I am a pollster who takes the Tory whip, rather than a Tory peer who polls.

Certainly I want to see a Conservative government with an overall majority. …