An Introduction to Classical Evangelical Hermeneutics: A Guide to the History and Practice of Biblical Interpretation

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An Introduction to Classical Evangelical Hermeneutics: A Guide to the History and Practice of Biblical Interpretation. Edited by Mal Couch. Grand Rapids: Kregel, 2000, 371 pp., n.p. paper.

This work consists of 23 chapters by seven scholars. Most (but not all) of the chapters are adapted from previously published works; some of the chapters are unattributed to any author or source. The volume is produced "in honor of The Conservative Theological Society" (p. 3), and its essays are devoted to presenting and defending an explicitly premillennial hermeneutic, formulated in contrast to the amillennial hermeneutic of Hodge and Berkhof.

After an introductory chapter by the editor ("God Has Spoken," [pp. 11-14]), the essays are as follows: "The Evangelical Doctrine of Inspiration and Inerrancy - Restated," by Bobby Hayes (pp. 15-31); "Systematic Theology and Hermeneutics," by Ron Johnson (pp. 32-47); "Theological and Prophetic Systems Throughout History," (pp. 48-51); "Principles of Hermeneutics," (pp. 52-70); "Symbols and Types in Prophecy," by Paul Lee Tan (pp. 71-84); "The Early Church Fathers and the Foundations of Dispensationalism," by Larry V. Crutchfield (pp. …