A Dictionary of Modern Music and Musicians

A Dictionary of Modern Music and Musicians

A Dictionary of Modern Music and Musicians

A Dictionary of Modern Music and Musicians

Excerpt

The political confusion which began in 1914, and from which Europe has not yet been able wholly to emerge, has affected the world of music in many ways. In some countries it has deeply intensified the desire for music and the will to create it; in others it has to some extent caused music to be laid aside as a matter of secondary interest. A sharply accentuated sense of nationalism, however valuable a stimulus it may have given in individual cases, has hindered that free international exchange of musical ideas which up to 1914 had been developing for generations. The English musical public has shown for centuries a healthy curiosity about the music of the whole civilised world; Dr. Burney's General History of Music, published towards the end of the eighteenth century, and Grove's Dictionary of Music and Musicians, begun a hundred years later, are both of them now recognised abroad as well as at home as pioneer works in their respective lines. The last thirty years have, in spite of all the damage caused by political events, brought about an enormous increase of interest in music in England and a growing consciousness that music can be, in the best sense, a form of national self-expression. It is, indeed, one of the healthiest signs of our new musical life that we still feel, no less than our predecessors, that vigorous curiosity about the music of other countries; but the normal sources of information have been obstructed, and the lover of music, not only in England but in all countries, has been cut off from knowledge.

The object of this new Dictionary is to supply the musician and the general musical reader with a concise and practical survey of all modern musical activities. Its backward limit has been fixed at or about 1880, the year in which Parry's Prometheus Unbound marked the beginning of what has been called the English Renaissance. The period thus included covers, as regards the music of other countries, such outstanding landmarks of musical history as Wagner's Parsifal, Verdi's Otello and Falstaff, the later works of Brahms and César Franck, so that the reader may herefind information not only about the music of . . .

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