Report on Economic Conditions of the South

Report on Economic Conditions of the South

Report on Economic Conditions of the South

Report on Economic Conditions of the South

Excerpt

In the South, as elsewhere, the two most important economic endowments are its people and its physical resources. The 1937 census estimates showed that the 13 Southern States had more than 36 million persons. While this population is descended from the peoples of virtually every country of the world, a larger percentage derives from early American stock than that of any other region in the United States; 97.8 percent, according to the last census, was native born; 71 percent white, and 29 percent colored.

The birth rate in the South exceeds that of any other region, and the excess of births over deaths makes the South the most fertile source for replenishing the population of the United States. At a time when the population of the country as a whole is becoming stationary, there is a continuous stream of people leaving the South to work in other parts of the Nation--greatly in excess of the corresponding migration to the South.

The South is a huge crescent embracing 552 million acres in 13 States from Virginia on the east to Texas on the west. It has widely varying topographic conditions--vast prairies, wooded plains, fertile valleys, and the highest mountains in the eastern United States.

The transportation facilities of the South are, for the most part, excellent. It is covered by rail lines which connect the interior with ports and give easy access to other regions. Both the Mississippi and the Ohio Rivers' navi-

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