The Danger from Strangers: Confronting the Threat of Assault

The Danger from Strangers: Confronting the Threat of Assault

The Danger from Strangers: Confronting the Threat of Assault

The Danger from Strangers: Confronting the Threat of Assault

Synopsis

"What measures should we take to safeguard ourselves against criminal assault? In a recent report on crime in the United States, the Federal Bureau of Investigation announced that someone is the victim of an aggravated assault every 29 seconds; every 5 minutes, a person is forcibly raped; and every 21 minutes, a citizen is murdered. According to the U. S. Department of Justice, the chances of being the victim of a violent crime are greater than those of being hurt in a traffic accident. Confronted with the dramatic media attention paid daily to violent crime, Americans are searching for ways to reduce the risk of victimization. The Danger from Strangers: Confronting the Threat of Assault is the ideal handbook for self-protection; it acutely examines current trends in criminal behavior and victim response, and explains practical techniques citizens can use to avoid harm. James D. Brewer, an experienced victimologist and self-defense consultant, presents the best and most recent psychological, criminal justice, and security research available, in particular the mind, motivations, and methods of an assailant; the "street-proof" precautions needed to avoid a confrontation; the changes in behavior of victims or near-victims; the "vincibility scale": measure how attractive you are to a criminal; the dangerous threats to children, the aged, and the handicapped; the differences between forceful and non-forceful resistance; and the pros and cons of carrying or using weapons for self-defense. Unlike numerous books devoted to defending yourself during a confrontation, Brewer's primer outlines how to avoid a criminal assault before it escalates to violence. This invaluable guide draws lessons from revealing interviews with victims and criminals, and synthesizes the best advice of crime researchers, psychologists, and self-defense professionals. The Danger from Strangers is an extraordinarily relevant book for sociologists, criminologists, psychologists, behavioral therapists, psychiatrists, demographers, and current affairs analysts studying emotional and environmental factors that make a person vulnerable to a criminal act and the motivations provoking stranger assault. By reading and practicing the conflict avoidance exercises brilliantly articulated in this book, everyone will gain confidence and recover some of the quality of life that the rampant fear of crime has stolen away." Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Excerpt

The last decade of the twentieth-century in America has the unfortunate probability of being the most violent in post-Civil War America. From coast to coast and border to border, in the country's metropolitan regions, as well as its small towns and rural areas, crime has become the principal concern of Americans. From kindergartners to the elderly, they feel and express similar concerns about the dangers lurking just beyond the front doors of their homes. Law enforcement officials, from the local police station to the Department of Justice in Washington, D.C., are searching for effective approaches to reduce violence on the streets of the cities, towns, and suburbs, all of which are struggling to find solutions to these seemingly intractable problems.

Violence has now created a fear of injury or death that is viewed by teenagers as the primary concern in their lives, with concern about drugs coming in a close second. James Brewer, in The Danger from Strangers, has taken a positive approach to helping concerned people think through their own personal circumstances in order to find the means and methods that will help them reduce their exposure to violence and assault.

The Danger from Strangers is chock-full of facts and figures supported by Brewer's thoughtful analysis of what they will mean . . .

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