The New Map of South America

The New Map of South America

The New Map of South America

The New Map of South America

Excerpt

When "The New Map of Europe" appeared in 1914 we were asked why we had chosen that title. For we had written on international political relations, not on geography. There seemed to be more justification for "The New Map of Africa," the title of the second volume in the series, published in 1916. Africa was a new continent to Europeans, and most of its political history -- and of its frontiers -- had to do with the times in which we lived. The original query was revived in 1919 when "The New Map of Asia" appeared. What countries were there in Asia, with lately determined boundaries, that would enable one to speak of a "New Map"?

And yet the title of the series is preserved in this fourth volume, written fourteen years after "The New Map of Europe" attempted to give the story of international relations during the years leading up to the World War. We have never felt that the titles were misnomers. The map of a continent should be constantly in mind when we are studying the family behavior of the countries in it. Every year we have the privilege of telling the G-2 class at the Army War College that they must learn to visualize the map when they read about places and study countries. Without having to look it up each time, they ought to know how a country stands, geographically, in relation to its neighbors and to the open sea; they ought to have a . . .

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