The Boston Campaign: April 1775-March 1776

The Boston Campaign: April 1775-March 1776

The Boston Campaign: April 1775-March 1776

The Boston Campaign: April 1775-March 1776

Synopsis

Drawing on memoirs, letters and detailed official documents, the author examines the struggle for Lexington and Concord and assesses the storming of Bunker Hill in the light of new evidence on this decisive confrontation.

Excerpt

During the rainy, cold afternoon of Thursday, December 16, 1773, a crowd of over 7,000 people, almost half the population of Boston, filled Old South Meetinghouse to its capacity and swirled around surrounding streets. As sextons began lighting candles against the growing darkness, Samuel Adams stood on a pew in the front of the church and uttered a single sentence that would hurl the colonies toward war with Great Britain. Adams had just conferred with Francis Rotch, a 23-year-old Quaker from Nantucket who was part owner of the merchant ship Dartmouth, currently moored at nearby Griffin's Wharf. The ship's cargo hold was filled with 114 chests of East India Company tea. Rotch had just been informed by Royal Governor Thomas Hutchinson that, despite the protest of the citizens of Boston, the ship would not be permitted to return to England until the cargo was unloaded and the three pence a pound tax on tea was duly paid by the owners. When Rotch returned to Old South from his meeting with the governor it was nearly 6 P.M. and the tension was clearly mounting throughout the building. When the young merchant informed Adams that Hutchinson had refused to grant a pass, the veteran patriot leader rose and with a quavering voice announced, "This meeting can do nothing more to save the country. . . ."

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.