Confronting Cancer: How to Care for Today and Tomorrow

Confronting Cancer: How to Care for Today and Tomorrow

Confronting Cancer: How to Care for Today and Tomorrow

Confronting Cancer: How to Care for Today and Tomorrow

Synopsis

'Confronting Cancer' is a practical and readily understandable resource book that interprets the complexities of cancer for the patient, family, and medical personnel. In order to guide the patient through the phases of the disease, Dr. Sherry, and experienced cancer specialist, has organized the book into three parts: Part one distinctive nature of specific cancers and explains the basic rationale for treatment, Part two discusses orthodox and unorthodox therapies; Part three details common problems encountered by the patient.

Excerpt

I resolved to write this book after Hodgkin's disease was diagnosed in my brother-in-law, Jack, in 1989. In attempting to answer questions and allay the fears of the extended family—large even by Irish standards—I found that no single-volume reference explained Jack's disease and treatment options adequately. My family's confusion mirrored that of my patients, who were consistently overwhelmed by the complexities of cancer. Why couldn't needed cancer information be presented in clear, concise terms for persons struggling to cope with this disease? I believed that it could. This book represents my sincere attempt to provide such a reference— a comprehensive, medically accurate, and easily understood handbook for laypersons attempting to deal head-on with the disease.

I have written Confronting Cancer from the heart, patterning the book on my day-to-day experience in treating patients. I approach the reader as one of these patients. As an oncologist, my first meeting with a patient usually involves explaining the details of the diagnosed cancer and differentiating it from other types of cancer. To parallel this initial meeting, Part I of Confronting Cancer describes the 11 most common cancers, with individual chapters defining a cancer's unique behavior and the rationale for its treatment.

Once the type of cancer is defined and understood, the patient can begin to consider a viable treatment plan. Consequently, Part . . .

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