Integrated Public Lands Management: Principles and Applications to National Forests, Parks, Wildlife Refuges, and Blm Lands

Integrated Public Lands Management: Principles and Applications to National Forests, Parks, Wildlife Refuges, and Blm Lands

Integrated Public Lands Management: Principles and Applications to National Forests, Parks, Wildlife Refuges, and Blm Lands

Integrated Public Lands Management: Principles and Applications to National Forests, Parks, Wildlife Refuges, and Blm Lands

Synopsis

Integrated Public Lands Management is the only book that deals with the management procedures of all the primary public land management agencies -- National Forests, Parks, Wildlife Refuges, and the Bureau of Land Management -- in one volume. This book fills the need for a unified treatment of the analytical procedures used by federal land management agencies in planning and managing their diverse lands. The second edition charts the progress these agencies have made toward the management of their lands as ecosystems. It includes new U.S. Forest Service regulations, expanded coverage of Geographic Information Systems, and new legislation on the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and National Wildlife Refuges.

Excerpt

The first edition of this book on public lands management has its origin in two concerns. The first was the lack of a unified treatment of the analytical procedures used by federal land management agencies in planning and managing their diverse lands. There were excellent books on public lands laws and forest management but no single book dealing with management of the National Forests, National Parks, National Wildlife Refuges, or Bureau of Land Management lands. The second motivation stems from my concern that advances in valuing environmental benefits provided by natural resources have not been adequately incorporated into public lands management. This is coupled with a belief that if such advances are incorporated into public lands management decisions, these decisions would be more sound both environmentally and economically. In this volume, I hope to demonstrate that application of nonmarket valuation techniques to public lands management is relatively straightforward and that an economic way of thinking about public lands management trade-offs can help improve the environmental and economic benefits provided from public lands.

About half the book (Chapters 2 and 9 to 13) focuses specifically on the four main federal land management agencies (the Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Forest Service, and National Park Service). Much of the first half of the book, however, is devoted to presenting general principles applicable to management of many other types of public lands. Specifically, Chapters 1 and 3 to 8 present concepts and techniques that are equally applicable to other federal public lands management agencies, such as the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Bureau of Reclamation, and Tennessee Valley Authority, as well as state forests and state parks agencies.

A primary intent of the book is to teach upper-division and graduate students about how public lands planning and management are performed (i.e., how many of the theories and techniques learned in other classes are applied to managing the natural resources of the National Forests, National Parks, and Wildlife Refuges). Some basic knowledge equivalent to introductory economics and statistics courses is desirable but certainly not mandatory, because nearly all topics are introduced at an elementary level.

This book also offers constructive criticism of the current state of public lands management and provides concrete suggestions for improving the planning and management of our public lands. Such constructive criticism is in no way meant to belittle the extraordinary efforts made by the people who work for these four federal public lands management agencies. From my own years working with three of the four agencies, I know only too . . .

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