Mental Disorders, Medications, and Clinical Social Work

Mental Disorders, Medications, and Clinical Social Work

Mental Disorders, Medications, and Clinical Social Work

Mental Disorders, Medications, and Clinical Social Work

Synopsis

This essential resource, written for social workers by a social worker, discusses the etiology, epidemiology, assessment, and intervention planning for common disorders. Austrian goes beyond a linear classification approach, instead emphasizing a broad bio-psychosocial ecosystems perspective, which takes into account each client's unique situation. In addition to including the most up-to-date information on new medications, biochemical data on disease causes, and diagnostic tests, the thoroughly updated second edition also gives an overview and critique of managed care as it relates to the treatment of mental disorders.

Excerpt

The surgeon general's report released in December 1999 (Pear 1999) stated that one in five Americans experiences a diagnosable mental disorder in any given year. Mental illness is the second leading cause of disability, and treatment costs $69 billion annually. Social workers are by far the largest group of mental health providers in the United States. There are approximately 200,000 clinically trained social workers, more than the combined total number of providers in the three other mental health professions: psychology, psychiatry, and clinical nursing. Even though more clients receive mental health services from social workers than from other professionals, most of the texts on mental disorders and medications used in schools of social work have been written or compiled by psychiatrists and psychologists. This book has been written to provide students and beginning social workers with specific information about an area of clinical social work that intersects psychiatry, assessment, and intervention with people who have mental disorders. Rather than taking a linear, psychiatric approach, this book attempts to adhere to social work norms and uses as its framework the ecosystems perspective, which considers person-in-environment. It uses the social work terms exploration, assessment, and intervention rather than the medical terms study, diagnosis, and treatment. For advanced clinicians who may want to seek literature on specific disorders, a comprehensive list of references and additional readings has been provided.

Many social workers may work in interdisciplinary settings where they can call upon professionals from other disciplines to confirm their assessments, or with whom they can consult prior to intervention. Clients may . . .

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