Dorothy Day and the Catholic Worker Movement: Centenary Essays

Dorothy Day and the Catholic Worker Movement: Centenary Essays

Dorothy Day and the Catholic Worker Movement: Centenary Essays

Dorothy Day and the Catholic Worker Movement: Centenary Essays

Excerpt

Today, tomorrow, next year and throughout this new century Dorothy Day provokes us, pricks our consciences, upsets the comfort of middle class Christianity, and challenges our assimilation in contemporary American life by bearing witness to the possibility of living a life guided solely by the principles Christ proclaimed. Even though she began her work among the poor almost 70 years ago and died 20 years ago, she remains a modern presence, a voice which rises out of The Catholic Worker, her autobiographies, and the recollections of those who worked with her in the Catholic Worker movement. It is a voice which challenges us about the way we live our lives, that is to say, the way we live out our faith.

To members of Generation X and their younger counterparts searching for a meaningful faith and community, Day offers the vision of a community of faith which actively reaches out to the poor, the hungry, the alienated, as well as to those blinded to the suffering by their own comfort. For those who had to jettison their church in order to find God in the world, Day and the Catholic Worker movement provide a point of connection, a way of resolving the struggle. In this, she provokes both the young and their parents.

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